NTSB animation of Asiana Flight 214

NTSB Board Member Robert Sumwalt, a penalty against Asiana Airlines, A350-900 type certification, the Fisher P-75 Eagle, Jabiru engines, UAV sense and avoid, Etihad growth into Europe, and aircraft at the G20 summit.

Guest

Robert Sumwalt, Board Member, National Transportation Safety Board.

We talk with Robert about the process for being nominated and confirmed as an NTSB Board member, and the roles played by Board members, including being the face to the public for accident investigations, and reviewing and approving investigation reports.

We also talk about the NTSB’s “Most Wanted List of Transportation Safety Improvements,” the Board’s function as a court of appeals, and how the Board reaches consensus.

Robert was sworn in as the 37th Member of the NTSB in 2006, and President George W. Bush designated him as Vice Chairman of the Board for a two-year term. Then in 2011, President Barack Obama reappointed Robert to an additional five year term.

Prior to joining the Board, Robert was a pilot for 32 years, including 24 years as an airline pilot with Piedmont Airlines and US Airways. After his airline career, he managed the flight department for a Fortune 500 company. Robert has over 14,000 flight hours and has type ratings in five aircraft.

Robert conducted aviation safety research as a consultant to NASA’s Aviation Safety Reporting System, and he has written extensively on aviation safety matters, having published over 90 articles and papers, as well as co-authoring a book on aircraft accidents.

He holds a Master of Aeronautical Science (with Distinction) from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, specializing in Aviation/Aerospace Safety Systems and Human Factors Aviation Systems.

Follow the NTSB on Twitter at @NTSB.

News

Asiana Airlines Suspends Service to San Francisco

As a penalty for last year’s crash landing at SFO, Asiana Airlines must cease flights from Incheon, South Korea, to San Francisco for 45 days. This comes from the South Korean government. Unless the airline appeals, the flight suspension must take place within six months.

Airbus A350-900 Receives FAA Type Certification

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) previously awarded type certification in September.

David Vanderhoof’s Aircraft of the Week

Fisher P-75 Eagle

David explores the Eagle that was a turkey – the Fisher P-75 Eagle. The P-75 was an aircraft so bad it never got into production. However, it spared GM and Fisher Auto Body from producing B-29s, and put them into position after the war of being able to quickly get back into the auto business.

The Australia News Desk

Steve and Grant bring you the Australia Sports Desk report … ooops, hang on, that’s the Australia Aviation News Desk report – sorry about that.

CASA are all but grounding aircraft with Jabiru engines due to 40 engine failures in the past year (representing about 0.03% of all Jabiru movements)

The world’s longest serving commercial 747 pilot has been flying with Qantas since 1969 and will be commanding his final flight as we record. His son will be on board as his copilot

Spotters Mag (www.spottersmag.com) have launched an Australia/New Zealand variant of their online magazine.

Lots of aircraft in Brisbane for the G20 summit, including Air Force One which landed at RAAF Base Amberley bringing President Obama to the event (he ferried from Amberley to Brisbane in the Marine One helicopter).

Rob Mark’s Aviation Minute

Rob asks the question, “how do we safely separate manned and unmanned aircraft?” Sense and avoid doesn’t yet exist for unmanned drones.

Across the Pond

Ethihad 777-300ER A6-ETC Copyright BRIYYZ

Ethihad 777-300ER A6-ETC Copyright BRIYYZ

Pieter revisits the Middle East with Oussama Salah talking exclusively about Etihad growth into Europe. Oussamas Take Blog.

Mentioned

UK’s NATS Releases A Cool ATC Video

UK’s NATS Releases A Cool ATC Video

G20 Brisbane: World leaders and their super planes

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.

 



A-12 Blackbird at the California Science Center

Malaysia Airlines woes, F-35C conducting at-sea testing, what to do about thin airline seats, American flight attendants reject contract proposal, and Southwest Airlines Captain grabs the controls.

Guest

Our guest this episode is Dr. Kenneth Phillips, the Aerospace Science Curator of the California Science Center.  The Center aims to stimulate curiosity and inspire science learning in everyone through memorable experiences.

Phase III of the Science Center’s 25-year Master Plan features the Space Shuttle Endeavour and the Samuel Oschin Air and Space Center; the SKETCH Foundation Air and Space Gallery; the Roy A. Anderson A-12 Blackbird Exhibit and Garden; and development of the Creative World permanent gallery.

We talk with Ken about the Center’s mission, how the exhibits flow from one to another and tell a story, the role of a museum curator, and the different skill sets of the supporting staff. Admission to the California Science Center is free.

Ken has served as Curator for Aerospace Science since 1990 and develops the California Science Center Foundation’s programs and exhibits on aeronautics and space exploration. As Curator, he is responsible for creating the vision that shapes these programs and leading the team in the process that includes concept and storyboard development; multiple phases of design; prototype development and testing; artifact acquisition; audiovisual production; exhibit fabrication and research on visitor learning.

You can find the California Science Center on Facebook and Twitter.

News

MH370 Maybe Declared Officially Lost By December 2014, Says MAS Director

Maybe they will, maybe they won’t, but in any event, Malaysia Airlines seems headed for privatization.

F-35C

F-35C Initial At-Sea Testing Progressing Aboard USS Nimitz and F-35C Completes First Arrested Landing aboard Aircraft Carrier

The carrier variant of the F-35 is making progress in testing on the USS Nimitz.

New thinner ‘park bench’ airline seats, and what you can do about them

George Hobica (creator of airfarewatchdog.com) offers five possible solutions.

American flight attendants reject new contract

AA Flight Attendants say no to a new contract, by just 16 votes. Next, the issue goes to arbitration where the final agreement will be less attractive to the FAs.

Southwest Airlines Captain Broke Safety Rules Before 2013 New York Accident

The Southwest pilot in the LGA crash pulled the throttles back over the co-pilot’s hand, and lost her job.

David Vanderhoof’s Aircraft of the Week

David takes a moment to pay tribute to all Veterans.

The Australia News Desk

Grant’s birthday has aligned with Qantas releasing a retro livery that dates back to when he was born. He and Steve think it looks great!

Meanwhile, Grant’s been off flying hot air balloons and passing his biennial flight review while Jonesy’s flying his “new” Cessna home and Steve’s started a new job with the railway. It’s all “GO” at the AusDesk!

Listener Recording

Harriet and Micah

Micah tells the story of Harriet’s Helicopter Pilot.

Mentioned

SeatGuru – Everything you need to know about the seats on your next flight.

PT6Nation – All about the Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6 turboprop.

Flying Legends Air Show 2014 – A video trailer.

Air Tindi De Havilland Canada DHC-7-103 Dash 7 photographs from Ryan HothersallC-GCEV, C-GCPY, C-GCEV, C-GCEV, C-GUAT.

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.



Aero Electric Aircraft Corporation (AEAC)

The Sun Flyer solar-electric General Aviation airplane, the FAA and GA accidents, the SpaceShipTwo accident, the Ford bomber plant, and the last MD-11 passenger flight.

Guest

George Bye is CEO of Bye Aerospace and also Chairman of AEAC, the Aero Electric Aircraft Corporation which was created to produce and market the Aero Electric “Sun Flyer,” a two seat solar-electric general aviation aircraft.

George is an ATP rated pilot who has logged over 4,000 flying hours. He was a USAF instructor pilot in the Northrop T-38 Talon, a C-141B Aircraft Commander, and he is a Desert Storm veteran.

George has developed a number of aircraft and technologies, including electric and solar UAVs, and the Javelin, that beautiful two-seat jet that was intended for military training as well as civil use.

We talk with George about the technology and the economic imperative of the Sun Flyer solar electric aircraft. The current synergy of technology in aerodynamics and structure, motors, batteries, and solar cells creates the possibility of a solar electric trainer with significantly lower cost of operation.

News

USA Today: FAA, general aviation could have done more to save lives

A USA Today article titled “Investigation: Post-crash fires in small planes cost 600 lives” says that in the early 1990s the FAA proposed changes for small aircraft that would help prevent post-crash fires. But the cost of installing the equipment on new airplanes was deemed to be “too high compared to the dollar value of the lives that would be saved.” So the changes were not implemented and since 1993 604 people have died from post-crash fires.

Will Virgin Galactic’s Crash End Space Tourism?

Shortly after being released by the WhiteKnightTwo, the rocket powered SpaceShipTwo came apart, killing one of the two pilots.

Virgin Galactic was founded by Richard Branson to provide commercial space tourism. The WhiteKnightTwo airplane is powered by commercially available jet engines and carries the rocket-powered of SpaceShipTwo to altitude. SpaceShipTwo is released, fires it’s rocket motor, and shoots up to suborbital space. From there, it glides to a landing.

Before the accident, listener Trevor sent in a link to a fascinating video: Commercial Jetliner Joined by Virgin Galactic.

Yankee Air Museum Takes Ownership of Willow Run Plant

During WWII, the Ford Bomber Plant at Willow Run in Ypsilanti, Michigan produced the B-24 Liberator. Since then the facility changed owners, but now it will be saved to become a museum. The Yankee Air Museum will now become the National Museum of Aviation and Technology at Historic Willow Run.

With Last MD-11 Passenger Flight, Another Aviation Icon Goes Away

The last commercial passenger revenue flight by a McDonnell Douglas MD-11 has taken place. It was a KLM Royal Dutch Airlines flight from Montreal to Amsterdam. KLM planned events around the flight and many aviation enthusiasts were onboard.

David Vanderhoof’s Aircraft of the Week

The deHavilland Canada  DHC-7 or  DASH-7.

Rob Mark’s Aviation Minute

Rob thanks the men and women who worked tirelessly to restore ATC service after the Chicago Center fire.

Across the Pond

Matt Willis returns to talk with Pieter Johnson about Naval Air History and his latest projects including the Fairey Barracuda, a new novel, and why the P51 has so many myths surrounding it. Follow @NavalAirHistory on Twitter.

Mentioned

Australian Man Parks Wingless Airplane at Pub

From photographer Paul Filmer:

Manila Airport (RPLL) – Prop Aircraft

Beech Starships at Centennial (KAPA)

Avra Valley, AZ (KAVQ) – 2007 and 2009 (now called Marana Regional)

Silicon Valley can keep its Teslas and robotic cars: Slovakia’s AeroMobil just unveiled a flying car

AeroMobil website.

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.



KC-135R Stratotanker refuels an F-22 Raptor. U.S. Air Force photo by Kevin Robertson.

Aerial refueling, airline profits boosted by lower fuel prices, the future of the U.S. Air Force, bad behavior at the airport, and the NBAA Convention.

Guest

Guest Matt Fritz is a KC-135 Instructor and Commander with over 2000 hours, including combat and combat support. He is also a certified acquisition professional, a certified Emotional Intelligence Trainer/Practitioner, and the Author of an instructional book entitled, “Leveraging Your LinkedIn Profile for Success.” Matt actively blogs with other military leaders at GeneralLeadership.com, as well as at his personal blog AdvancedVectors.com. He’s a civilian licensed commercial pilot with multi-engine and turbine ratings.

We talk about the role of the KC-135 tanker, an aircraft with a mix of old and new technology. Also, the future look of the Air Force, and the importance of open communication between military leaders and the public – connecting the warrior to the citizen.

Matt has some advice for young pilots who aspire to serve their country as a military aviator, and he tells us a story about a brand new boom operator flying over Afghanistan on a night mission.

News

Cheaper Fuel Leads to Record Profits at Airlines

Third Quarter airline results are in, with American Airlines, United Continental Holdings, and Southwest Airlines seeing record profits. A big part of the reason? Lower fuel prices.

America’s Enemies Beware: The U.S. Air Force Is Set to Soar (and Become Even Deadlier)

This article in The National Interest argues that between now and 2035, the U.S. Air Force will come to look very different than it has in the past.

Historically, they say, the Air Force has been defined by it’s platforms: fighters, bombers, airlifters, refuelers, surveillance and reconnaissance, and command and control.

The authors see a future where the Air Force will not focus on aircraft types, but on the Airmen, who will become “cyber-aided warriors with tremendous reach.”

Homophobic Man Taken Down at Airport After Inciting Brawl Over “Queers”

A man at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, who was described by some as drunk or on drugs, started a fight with another man wearing a pink shirt. When it got physical, passengers standing around jumped in, tackled the man, and held him down until police officers put him in handcuffs. All this was caught on video.

NBAA’s 2014 Convention Wraps Up as a Highly Successful Show

Rob gives us highlights from the NBAA Convention, which saw some 1,100 exhibitors, more than 100 aircraft, with over 26,000 people in attendance.

Aircraft of the Week

"SUEreabasteciendo1" by Martín Otero - Own work.

The MiG-28, the Exocet, and the Super Etendard.  David looks at one of the dumbest lines in Moviedom and TOPGUN.  “They are the MiG-28 and carry the Exocet anti-shipping missile.”  Flashback to when the movie was made and we explore why the Exocet was on everyone’s mind.

The Australia News Desk

Steve talks with Rod Rakic and brings us an update on Open Airplane, a service that assists pilots who want to rent an airplane. The network now has 72 locations in the U.S. with over 250 aircraft available, now including light twins, LSA, and tail draggers. 8000 pilots have signed up.

Across the Pond

Airline seats

Pieter talks to Marisa Garcia from www.flightchic.com about the latest trends in airline seating,  and her busy travel schedule. “If you want to cover aviation, you’ve got to fly…..”

Credit

U.S. Air Force KC-125 photo by Kevin Robertson.

“SUEreabasteciendo1″ by Martín Otero – Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons.

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.



Mituibishi MRJ

The first Mitsubishi MRJ, screening for Ebola at the airport, the aging military aircraft fleet, mobile phones on the plane, FAA drone enforcement for licensed pilots, and Airways News.

Guest

We talk with Benét Wilson, Co-Editor-in-Chief of Airways News, about the strategic alliance between Airways Magazine and Airchive.com. Airways News provides continuous updates of news, features, and information about the commercial aviation industry.

Benét  Wilson is an aviation journalist and blogger who has covered the industry for many media outlets, including About.com, Cranky Flier, ACI-NA Centerlines, Aviation International News, Airport World and the Airline Passenger Experience magazine. She was previously e-newsletter and social media editor at AOPA. She was also an editor for Aviation Week/Aviation Daily, and has served in senior communications positions at the Regional Airline Association, Mesa Air Group, Rolls-Royce North America and Delta.

Benét’s personal blog is Aviation Queen, and you can follow her on Twitter as @AvQueenBenet.

News

Mitsubishi Aircraft rolls out first MRJ and Mitsubishi MRJ Rolls Out After Four-Year Delay

On October 18, Mitsubishi Aircraft rolled out its first flight test aircraft for the MRJ program. The second and third flight test aircraft are in final assembly.This is the first Japanese commercial passenger aircraft in over 50 years.

Researchers Studied How Airport Screenings Impact Ebola’s Spread, And The Results Are Troubling

Researchers at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine write in the BMJ (formerly the British Medical Journal) that screening for Ebola (and SARS previously) at airports is completely ineffective.

Race against time: More people, money needed to keep aging fleets flying

US military aircraft are the oldest they have ever been (averaging 27 years), they have been used extensively in combat, and sequestration all combine to reduce mission capability.

World’s largest union for flight attendants sues US aviation authority to force passengers to put down their mobile phones during take-off and landing

The Association of Flight Attendants (AFA) sued the FAA, saying that since passengers are allowed to use mobile phones, they to ignore the safety announcements. Plus, smartphones could become dangerous projectiles if they are not put away.

Drone Pilots Beware: New FAA Enforcement Policy Targets You. Licensed Pilots At Particular Risk

FAA issued new guidance applicable to Unmanned Aircraft Systems “in violation of the Federal Aviation Regulations” and Model Aircraft “that endangers the safety of the National Airspace System.” Pilots who violate FAA drone regs stand to lose their license.

Aircraft of the Week

David caves to Facebook pressure and looks at an aircraft that history has been maybe too kind to: the Beech 2000 Starship. An aircraft ahead of its time.

The Australia News Desk

Steve’s back and he tells us about his trip to the USA, including the flights on Qantas A380s.  During his three week trip, among tons of other fun activities, he managed to log two flights of his own in Cessna 172s.

A huge thanks goes to listener Fred Samson who contacted Steve and offered him the chance to fly a G1000 equipped 172 with him through the SFO class B airspace, taking in views of the airport, city and Golden Gate Bridge  A couple of weeks later, thanks to Open Airplane and Airwork Las Vegas, he got the chance to fly a C172N (N738CY) out of North Las Vegas for an hour of manouvers and sight seeing in the local area.  Once again, a huge thanks goes out to Rod Rakic and CFI Jackie Maas for making this possible.

David, Steve, and the tailhook

David, Steve, and the tailhook

To add to all of this, Steve spent a day in Philadelphia with David and Michelle, visiting a local helicopter museum, plane spotting at PHX and, of course, dining on famous Philly cheese steaks. Steve says he’ll definitely be returning to that great city!

Red Bull Air Race

The Las Vegas round of the Red Bull Air Race ended somewhat controversially thanks to high desert winds springing up on race day, causing havoc for pilots as they attempted to make their way through the course.  In one run through, Austrian champion Hannes Arch clipped two air gates, mainly due to the wind pushing them into his aircraft as he passed them.  The race was finally abandoned after Canadian Pete Macleod refused to enter the course, deeming it unsafe.  After much discussion, Macleod was declared the winner of the round, based on him qualifying fastest the day before.

Also in this report, we play an interview Steve recorded with American champion Kirby Chambliss where he reviews his season and identifies areas for improvement in coming rounds.  He also discusses the challenges of differing density altitude between race locations, the 10 G limit now in place for all race pilots, and origins of his flying style.

All this and Virgin Australia purchased TigerAir – what were they thinking????

Across the Pond

Danish Smart Drone

Danish Smart Drone

Pieter returns the conversation to Scandinavia to talk with Marisa Garcia and get updates on Finnair’s growth and Denmark’s UAV market. Marissa blogs Boeing to Assist Sky-Watch in Developing New Danish Smart Drone.

Mentions

Ninoy Aquino International Airport

Hoovenson’s photo of the section of Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) in the Philippines where they park old, derelict airplanes. Can you see the Lockheed Constellation that the Qantas Founders Museum purchased?

Cranky Concierge for commercial flight planning and following.

Aviation Careers Podcast – Scholarships page

Take advantage of aviation scholarships by Benét Wilson.

Women in Aviation – Scholarships

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.



Weeks and Howard's S-43_400

The passenger experience: social media, in-flight connectivity, wearable technology, seat pitch.

Guest

Aviation journalist Mary Kirby is founder and editor of the Runway Girl Network, a B2B2C source for intelligence about the passenger experience. The Network covers the industry from nose to tail, in the air, and on the ground. Be sure to follow the #PaxEx hashtag.

Topics

Tweeting While Flying, Part II: Another Passenger Booted From Flight After Tweeting

A JetBlue passenger tweeted that the pilot was or might have been intoxicated. Another passenger in turn Tweeted about this but was denied re-boarding after the pilot was cleared.

Airline passengers are increasingly using social media to make comments about the airline or the flight. Just what does it take for a passenger to be considered “disruptive”? Airlines need a protocol for how a they respond to the new level of social media activity and scrutiny.

“I Have Ebola”: Passenger Causes Scare on Flight That Departed From Philly

On a flight from PHL to the Dominican Republic, a 54-year-old man had reportedly said “I have Ebola, you are all screwed.” The plane was met by a team in full hazmat suits at the destination.

Screenings have been stepped up at JFK for passengers arriving from high risk countries.

Passengers can make bad jokes or inappropriate comments that can affect flight safety. What should the consequences be?

Airline Passengers Ready for Wearable Tech

A recent SITA survey shows technology improves the passenger experience. Almost 77% of surveyed passengers said they would be comfortable with the use of wearable tech to help them on their journey.

Airlines who seek to differentiate themselves on service are looking at wearables like Google Glass.

We also examine in-flight connectivity, who the providers are, and opportunities in an environment where penetration outside the US is only estimated to be 6%

The Gogo Text & Talk product lets you use your mobile phone in flight, and is rolling out to business aviation.

Could major US airline create an “economy minus” cabin?

A US legacy airline is shopping around the idea that it’s planning to create a dedicated “economy minus” cabin. This could be a trial balloon, but maybe not.

Low Cost Carriers (LCC) and Ultra Low Cost Carriers (ULCC) are putting a lot of pressure on the US majors. Who will go below the 28” seat pitch?

Aircraft of the Week

Jamie Dodson tells us about the Sikorsky S-43 Amphibian.

The Australia News Desk

Grant has been flying a balloon again, and he’s taken Evan Schoo and Albert up with him. They take a moment from the flight to record an intro, then Grant slots in these news items:

  • Changes have started at CASA but the official response to the Aviation Safety Regulatory Review (aka, The Forsyth Report) haven’t come out yet. That response is due by the end of 2014.
  • The Qantas Founders Museum have purchased a Lockheed Super Constellation to join the aircraft on display at Longreach in outback Queensland.

The Aviation Minute

Rob looks at how personal electronic devices impair the pre-flight safety briefing.

Across the Pond

Pieter visits Tim Robinson at the Royal Aeronautical Society’s London HQ, 4 Hamilton Place. Hallowed ground for any aviation and aerospace geek.

Mentioned

617 Squadron and the Dams Raid

Seaplane in Tasmania 3 Sir John Falls

Wright Brothers National Memorial

National Historical Park, Ohio

Carillon Historical Park

Hawthorn Hill

Henry Ford Museum’s Greenfield Village

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.



Beechcraft

Aircraft salvage, the Chicago ATC Center fire, airline cyber threats, effects of aviation product liability, and a new Sikorsky fast attack helicopter.

Guest

Rachel Payne talks about how aircraft salvage company FAST Aviation locates airplanes, gets them back flying, or parts them out to support general aviation aircraft owners. We also discuss Hangar Swap, the new marketplace for aviators.

1952 R model Beechcraft Bonanza

1952 R model Beechcraft Bonanza

Follow @FASTAviationFL and @HangarSwap on Twitter, and find FASTaviation and HangarSwap on Facebook.

News

Chicago Bizav Traffic Moving Following ATC Center Fire

An update on the recent air traffic control center fire, which is still at ATC Zero.

Boeing urges airlines to be vigilant of cyber security threats

At the Aircraft Commerce magazine’s recent Aircraft e-Enablement conference in London, John Craig, Boeing’s chief engineer of cabin and network solutions, gave the industry a warning: don’t ignore cyber security. There are lots of opportunities for hackers.

Liability: The Price We Pay

Product liability costs can contribute significantly to high prices. This article explores some of the ways insurance and litigation costs impact the industry.

Sikorsky S-97 Raider

S-97 Raider High-Speed Attack Helicopter Debuts

Sikorsky Aircraft unveiled the a prototype S-97 Raider high-speed attack helicopter. This features a coaxial rotor and a rear-mounted propeller, giving it a top speed of 253 miles per hour – almost twice what you’d get from current attack helicopters.

Jerrie Mock, first woman to fly solo around the world, dies at 88

Geraldine “Jerrie” Fredritz Mock flew solo around the world in 1964. The flight took 29 days, and covered almost 22,860 miles.

Addison Airport just went live with the first at a GA EMAS in Texas. A 5-minute time-lapsed video shows the entire 6 week project.

David’s Report

David describes his trip to the Wright Brothers National Memorial at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.

The Australia News Desk

Grant’s flying solo and talks about the Martin Jetpack company going for an IPO, and then covers some problems with CASA’s recent introduction of Part 61 licenses.

After that it’s on to the military and he wonders how the RAAF will fit their two new C17s into the available space at RAAF Base Amberley, not to mention the new C27Js which will eventually be based there as well. Anyone got a shoe horn?

Grant wraps it all up with the news that the RAAF’s first two F35s have flown and are going through their acceptance flight tests before heading to Luke AFB next year for use with RAAF pilot training.

Across the Pond

Pieter Johnson talks to Managing Editor of The Aviation Historian, Mick Oakey about the latest edition. You will learn why flying a supersonic jet, literally makes your teeth fall out!

Mentioned

Worldflight group website and the Cockpitbuilders Worldflight Team USA, “flying” full scale flight simulators to take part in a round-the-world flight for charity. Each team raises money for a different charity in their local country through their own individual websites.

The Grumman G-21A Goose and the De Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver Mk1, by Ryan Hothersall.

As listener Patrick was taking off from Salt Lake International, he looked down and saw a strange aircraft sitting on the ramp.  A closer look showed that the line folks had arranged baggage carts into the full scale shape of an airplane:

Baggage carts

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.

 



Oceana Airshow Geico Flight / Honor Flight

Results from our listener survey, the B787 battery issue, Air Traffic Control Center vulnerability, historic aircraft, flying a float plane, and air-to-air photography.

News

Boeing, FAA Don’t Understand 787 Battery Shortcomings, Japanese Say

After the Boeing 787 experienced Lithium Ion battery problems, Boeing made some changes designed to reduce the chances of thermal runaway, and to better manage the situation should it occur. But the root cause for the problem was never determined. By Christine Negroni in her Flying Lessons blog.

Illinois man accused of torching air traffic center was being transferred to Hawaii

A disgruntled FAA contractor posted a suicide note on Facebook, brought a can of gasoline into the Chicago Air Route Traffic Control Center, and set the place on fire, affecting more than 2,000 flights. The man was found by paramedics as he attempted to end his life with a knife.

Allen vs Jackson to restore or recreate the battle for collections

Paul Allen (co-Founder of Microsoft) and Peter Jackson of (Lord Of The Rings Fame) are both amassing huge warbird collections.  They are being painstakingly restored by Allen and  completely recreated from scratch by Jackson using original plans.  The article questions if flying these on of a kind aircraft is worth the risk.  Also does creating a “Clone” of an original demean the original and cloud the historical significance.

Flying a Seaplane

Rob’s been learning to fly a float plane.

David’s Report

Geico Skytypers Blue Angels

The Geico Skytypers were invited by the Blue Angels to do a formation flight, and they wanted to David to take some air-to-air photographs. David relates that adventure.

David in Texan

At the Naval Air Station Oceana Air Show, David spoke with Kenneth Hess, the Public Affairs Officer for the Chief of Naval Operations, Energy and Environmental Readiness Division. They discussed biofuels and goals of the Navy to reduce energy consumption. Ken mentions the free Energy Warrior app, which lets you discover what the Navy is doing to lead change and increase combat capability. You also learn facts about U.S. oil dependence, and what America’s Navy is doing about it.

Also at Oceana, David spoke with air show and event announcer Ric Peterson about what it takes to be an announcer.

The Australia News Desk

WONZ DH.83 Fox Moth

In one of the shortest AusDesks of all time, Grant chats briefly with Errol Cavit and Zac Yates after the recent Wings Over New Zealand Forum meet-up at Ardmore Airport near Auckland.

WONZ Two Seat Spitfire

In addition to Grant scoring a flight in a de Havilland DH.83 Fox Moth, there were plenty of amazing aircraft (including a 2-seat Spitfire) and excellent presentations during the day (plus some beer at the end).

Across the Pond

Ascender © Bristol Spaceplanes

Ascender © Bristol Spaceplanes

Pieter looks at the UK Government Review of commercial spaceplane certification and operations: Technical Report [PDF], as well as the recent news on MOM, MAVEN and Rosetta.

Mentioned

Airbus helps develop first supersonic biz jet

Rand Peck Aviation Photography

AIR14 – The pilots’ view

Plane Spotting: U.N. Brings Rare Jets to NYC

Melanoma Incidence Is Much Higher for Flight Crews

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.



Navion

The single engine Navion airplane, air traffic controller hiring guidelines, Air France pilot’s strike, robots flying airplanes, Delta Air Line’s refinery, and NextGen.

Guest

Chris Gardner is founder and CEO of Sierra Hotel Aero, holder of the type certificate for the single engine Navion airplane.

Chris has a commercial aviation background, as well as extensive experience with North American Aviation aircraft including rebuilding and modification for racing of the P-51 Mustang, the T- 28, and Navion aircraft.

We review a little of the history of the Navion and how it was originally envisioned by North American Aviation to attract the interest of pilots returning from World War II.

With Sierra Hotel Aero now owning the type certificate, there are opportunities to modernize and upgrade the airplane. Chris is working on an STC for larger engine for the airplane.

Sierra Hotel Aero provides rebuild and modification services, including installation of the BRS Aerospace ballistic recovery parachutes in Cessna 172’s and 182’s.

For more on the Navion, see Navion X and the American Navion Society. Find Navion Aircraft on Facebook.

News

Two Illinois lawmakers seek to dump new FAA controller hiring rules

For years, when it came to recruiting new air traffic controllers the FAA favored graduates from FAA-accredited college aviation programs and also military veterans with aviation experience. The general public came last. But the FAA changed that not too long ago and started to favor inexperienced applicants. Some think this negatively impacts safety, and have introduced the Safe Towers Act.

French govt ups pressure to end Air France pilots strike

Air France pilots are worried that a a new Air France-KLM initiative to increase the size of its LC carrier Transavia will suck jobs away jobs.

Tiny Humanoid Robot Learning to Fly Real Airplanes

At the 2014 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems in Chicago, the PIBOT from Korean maker Robotis was demonstrated. It operated simulated aircraft controls autonomously.

Benet Wilson Named New Co-Editor-in-Chief at Airways News

Aviation Queen Benet Wilson is set to join Airways News, the strategic alliance between Airchive.com and Airways Magazine.

Memorium

Union leader Robert E. Poli led the 1981 air traffic controllers’ strike, which prompted President Ronald Reagan to dismiss 11,500 controllers. Poli died September 15 at his home in Meridian, Idaho. He was 78.

Airplane of the Week

Grumman OA-12 Duck USAF

Jamie Dodson presents the history of the Grumman J2F Duck. Be sure to visit Jamie’s website at NickGrantAdventures.com and have a look at his historical fiction novels.

Rob Mark’s Aviation Minute

Rob gives us a list of great aviation writers you should read.

The Australia News Desk

Grant and Steve join live from Steve’s studio, and talk about RAAF fighter pilots being deployed in an active combat area, the Women’s World Hot Air Balloon Championship, and the Great Tiger Moth Air Race in Australia.

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @PCDU. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124.

Mentioned

How Delta Bought A Refinery And Wound Up Saving Its Rivals A Ton Of Cash

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.



Altair with Infrared Imaging Sensor

NASA’s aeronautical research activities, Boeing and Airbus production rates, an NTSB report on pilots and drugs, and an update on the F-35 engine fire.

Guest

Maj. Gen. Charles Frank Bolden, Jr., (USMC-Ret.) has been the NASA Administrator since July, 2009. During Charlie’s 34-year career with the Marine Corps, he served 14 years in NASA’s Astronaut Office and traveled to orbit four times aboard the space shuttle.

Charlie flew more than 100 combat missions in North and South Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. He has a lengthy and distinguished career serving his country, including receiving the Defense Superior Service Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross. He was inducted into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame in May 2006.

We talk about the role of government in general and NASA in particular when it comes to taking the development risks that industry cannot. Charlie tells us about NASA’s development of software tools for the FAA, including NextGen air traffic management tools.

We also discuss the allocation of funding between aeronautics and space, NASA activities in aircraft propulsion such as increasing efficiency of existing systems, recent biofuel tests, and projects with the Boeing eco-Demonstrator airplanes.

Charlie believes that supersonic transports can be in our future and tells us about NASA activity to address the sonic boom problem.

NASA is actively involved with the FAA and the six UAS test sites as autonomous flight technologies are developed. NASA focuses on sense and avoid and is looking at sUAS air traffic control.

We get an update on the commercialization of space flight, climate change and greenhouse warming, and space technology management.

Visit the NASA web page for a wealth of information, follow them on Twitter, and read NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden’s Blog.

The News

Boeing, Airbus seriously studying speeding factories

Boeing and Airbus are looking at boosting the production rates for the 737 and A320 families of airplanes. Orders have poured in and the airframers have years of backlog. Will the supply chain be able to sustain higher rates?

NTSB Study on Drug Use in Aviation Shows Upward Trend in Use of Potentially Impairing Medications; First Step in Understanding Drug Use and Accident Risk

The NTSB looked at more than 6,600 toxicology tests performed on pilots killed in aviation accidents from 1990 through 2012, 96% of which were GA. NTSB Acting Chairman Christopher A. Hart said, “I think that the key take-away from this study for every pilot is to think twice about the medications you’re taking and how they might affect your flying. Many over-the-counter and prescription drugs have the potential to impair performance, so pilots must be vigilant to ensure that their abilities are in no way compromised before taking to the skies.”

See also, NTSB releases study on medication, drug use: AOPA cautions findings are incomplete and inconclusive.

F-35 Fire: In Search Of A Solution

At Eglin AFB on June 23, 2014, F-35 AF-27 experienced a significant engine fire, grounding the fleet. It appears that engine flex caused a “hard rub” of the fan stage stator against the rotor. The friction caused heating, which led to micro-cracks in some blades. Then in normal operation, the cracks grew and the blades eventually failed. Pratt & Whitney is redesigning some components, but the root cause for the engine flex has not yet been identified.

David Vanderhoof’s Airplane of the Week

Douglas C-74 Globemaster

The Douglas C-74 Globemaster.

With all the recent humanitarian news, the Boeing C-17A is getting a lot of attention. It’s often referred to as a Globemaster, but it’s time to set the record straight and talk about the real Globemaster – the Douglas C-74 and its son the C-124 Globemaster II, making the C-17A the Globemaster III.

Across the Pond

Finnair

Pieter Johnson has news of the UK Airports Commission decision to reject London Mayor Boris Johnson’s idea for an Estuary Airport (affectionately known as “Boris Island”). He also looks at Ryanair’s Boeing 737Max order, and some new services from both Finnair and Qatar Airways.

Find Pieter on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on Facebook at XTPMedia, and at the Aviation Xtended podcast.

Shout Out

In Episode 134 of the Airline Pilot Guy podcast, Capt. Jeff offers a very good discussion of hypoxia, with ATC recordings from the TBM-900 that crashed off Jamaica, and other examples.

Mentioned

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.

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