Photo by Seb Spencer

In this episode, Rob, Max, and David discuss aviation news, with a focus on odd stories. Then Dan brings in Tom from The Airline Blog to talk about some additional stories. David has six interviews from the 2010 Joint Service Open House, as well as his usual This Week in Aviation segment. Finally, Steve and Grant have this week’s Australia Desk report.

The news:

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Australia Desk Report music is Journey of the Sorcerer by The Eagles, used in the British TV version of the Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy.

Post photo courtesy listener Seb Spencer.

Opening and closing music is provided by Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at http://www.brotherloverocks.com/.

6 Responses to “Episode 99 – Bits and Pieces”

  1. Mike

    Hey, just listening to episode 99 (congratulations by the way) and it’s now patently apparent why Rob Whiner is so anti Boeing – he had his airplane drawings knocked back by Boeing when he was a child in 1929 and he’s been holding a grudge ever since.

    Apart from that, great show and I’m looking forward to the big three figure show next week.

    Cheers, Mike

    June 2nd, 2010 | 1:31 pm
  2. Mike: That’s funny, really funny.

    June 2nd, 2010 | 2:39 pm
  3. [From Michael...]

    This is just one of the many reasons why the statement that we’ve seen the last pilots of piloted military aircraft, will prove false:

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100529/ap_on_re_as/as_afghanistan

    There is still no substitute for the (admittedly flawed) human brain and Mark 1 eyeball.

    We’ve been promised the “paperless office” for decades, now, but we now produce MORE paper in many cases, due to computers. As an architect I can tell you that because we have to plot our drawings to see them full size (there is only so much you can see on a screen), we create a LOT more paper than in the old days.

    95% of airline passengers, even way into the future, will never be comfortable with,
    or stand for, a pilotless aircraft. You can quote me on that 50 or 100 years from
    now :-)

    June 3rd, 2010 | 2:17 am
  4. [From Tim, on a 19 June 2010 event. For more see http://www.blackstoneflyin.wordpress.com/.

    Hello,

    I am putting together a first ever fly-in at the Blackstone(Fort Pickett) airfield in Blackstone, VA. Most people don’t realized this is a joint use airport. Please mention this great General Aviation event. It is free to all

    Keep up the good work,

    Tim

    June 3rd, 2010 | 2:20 am
  5. [Ken sends in this...]

    Episode 98 – Another great show, just wanted to add few comments:

    The 737 re-engine discussion – Perhaps it’s time they just throw in the towel and start with a new design. I can’t really speak to the gains technology has to offer, but I often hear of crews on the forms complain about the 73’s lack of ergonomics. They say since it was mid-60’s design, originally intended for short hops, the new long range 7-3’s still leave pilots in cramped cockpits with little or no room for bags. And throw in a jump-seater, it’s an elbow to elbow fit, leaving you to reach over your shoulder just to close the cockpit door. I occasionally ride jump on the 7-3, so I know of the tight fit they speak of. Also, I hear the 3 by 3 abreast seating is not the most efficient passenger layout. So is another 7-3 variant really what we need? Perhaps it’s time to move on and consider a new starting point. I hear the new 787 was designed with considerable ergonomics, maybe a rescaled version of it or they could borrow from its lessoned learned.

    The Jump Seat – One of you guys mentioned how great it would be if others could experience this, what a great idea! However, in the climate of today’s post 9-11 era, I could never see that happening. But I think the idea has merit, if only they could set up some kind of pre-screening program that kept the feds happy, the airlines could sell these seats off at a premium, in the same way the Russians sell off seats to the Space Station to eccentric billionaires. One premium priced jump-seat could be a breakeven point on an otherwise empty airplane.

    Mr. Hamlin – Another great guest, and he’s a ‘Spotter’ too boot! There’s no doubt Mr. Hamlin is a wealth of industry knowledge, both past and present. I wanted to know more about his impressions of Lorenzo, specifically in relation to his handling of the whole Eastern thing. I wasn’t quite sure if he thought Lorenzo was an effective, model leader, who did what was needed in a changing era, or did he deserve any of the bad press of the day as a union buster and airline back breaker. Anyway, hope to see him back from time to time to hear his insights and outlook on the industry.

    Aloha,

    Ken
    CRJ FO at ASA

    June 3rd, 2010 | 2:23 am
  6. ErrolC

    Enjoyed the mini-interviews in this one, well done for the good questions David. Glad to see you are going to try for more at this weekend’s show, they would be a good occasional segment.
    @errolwi

    June 4th, 2010 | 5:44 pm
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