AirplaneGeeks 383 Henry Harteveldt on Air Travel

A wide-ranging conversation about airlines with travel industry analyst and advisor Henry Harteveldt. Also, United bundles amenities, the Mitsubishi MRJ is delayed, Allegiant Air mis-cues, the viability of an Uber for the skies, the Westland Lysander, aviation maintenance technician training, the English Electric Lightning, a book review, and bird strikes.

Guest

Henry Harteveldt

Henry Harteveldt

Henry Harteveldt is a well-known analyst and advisor in the travel industry. He spent more than 15 years in marketing, planning, distribution, and strategy roles at companies such as TWA, Continental Airlines, the Trump Organization, the Fairmont Hotel Management Company and GetThere. He was head of Forrester Research’s global travel research practice, and launched Atmosphere Research in September 2011 serving the global travel industry.

We discuss airline strategies for bundling amenities and what an airline “loyalty” program really is these days. Henry touches on airline labor relations, he describes the things he looks for in 2016, what the airlines might do with their profits, and how they might respond to the next downturn.

Henry shares some good insight on the low cost model, how travel technology companies enhance what airlines can offer and how that changes the passenger experience. We discuss IATA’s New Distribution Capability (NDC) standards, what that means for airline offerings and the total value presented to the consumer by the airline. (It’s more than just price.) Henry gives his opinion on the clash between US majors and Middle Eastern carriers, and why the US carriers have lost in Washington.

News

United offers amenity options bundled with Economy Plus

If you book and purchase your flight on United’s website, you can now take advantage of United Travel Options packages. These are bundles at a lower price than buying the amenities separately.

Japan’s Mitsubishi Delays Delivery Of Country’s First Passenger Jet After World War By A Year

The Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ) has been delayed again. Launch customer ANA Holdings had been planning first delivery in 2017 Q2. Mitsubishi has conducted flight tests and they are not saying specifically what is causing them to push out deliveries. Statements from the company suggest they were just too optimistic in their test schedule.

Fourth Allegiant Air flight diverted in a week

It seems Allegiant Air can’t stay out of the news. Flight 760 made an emergency landing after reporting an engine problem. A flight to Bangor, Maine was diverted after passengers reported an abnormal smell. Another flight to landed in North Dakota with a deicing equipment problem. A flight to Youngstown, Ohio was diverted to Jacksonville, Florida. That turned out to be a faulty indicator light.

Pilot Sues Allegiant Air, Says He Was Fired For Evacuating Jet

Flight attendants reported smelling smoke just after takeoff and the captain returned to the airport. Emergency vehicles arrived, the captain called for an evacuation, but some unidentified voice over the radio instructed the captain to stay put. After some time and confusion, the captain evacuated the airplane.

Allegiant Air escapes punishment for emergency landing in Fargo

An Allegiant Air MD-80 attempted to land at Fargo airport, but it was closed for an airshow rehearsal. They landed after using some of their emergency reserve fuel. The union questioned Allegiant’s safety. Now the FAA issued a “letter of correction,” which carries no enforcement action.

AA Ground Crew Learns a Lesson About Towing an MD-80

This video shows a tug pulling the nose gear right off.

It’s Time for an Uber of the Skies

Chris Elliott asks, “Airbnb changed the hotel industry. Uber changed ground transportation. So why can’t the same change happen for air travel?” The US airline industry is now highly consolidated, and commercial flight sharing could introduce competition. For this to happen, the rules need to change. Is the entire concept viable?

The Airplane of the Week

Westland Lysander IIIa

The Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum’s Westland Lysander IIIa by David Vanderhoof

With the disappearance of Westland Helicopters to Finmeccanica, it was time to do a Westland aircraft. So David chose his favorite, the Lysander!  It’s designer also designed the EE Lightning, so he can also say he started the Lightning segment.

See also, Westland P.12 Wendover from diseno-art.comThe Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum’s Westland Lysander IIIa, and Westland Lysander Mk. IIIA at the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum.

On the Mark with Rob Mark

Rob raises an issue about Aviation Maintenance Technician training.

Across the Pond

English Electric Lightning

English Electric Lightning XS420 copyright Richard Hall

After discussing the English Electric Lightning a few weeks ago, Pieter talks to Richard Hall. He owns XS420, a T5 model which serves as the Gate Guardian at the Farnborough Air Sciences Trust.

See also BAC (EE) Lightning T.5 – XS420, @XS420 on Twitter, and Aircraft & Airshow Photography By Richard Hall.

Book Review

Ian Kershaw reviews Sled Driver by author and SR-71 pilot Brian Shul, our guest on Episode 375.

Mentioned

Hainan Airlines 787

787 image courtesy Hainan Airlines

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.

 

1 thought on “AirplaneGeeks 383 Henry Harteveldt on Air Travel

  1. Christopher Sims

    I refer to the post by Chris Elliott about a Uber for the Sky’s. http://elliott.org/blog/its-time-for-an-uber-of-the-skies/
    I think that it’s important that such use of GA aircraft were allowed. Perhaps to start off this, the appropriate rules should be put in place to allow the following. If a business lets say is needing to charter an aircraft, there should be an appropriate platform to allow the either the charter operator or the lead charter to be able to onset the empty seats on a per seat basis.
    Lets face it, if this was allowed, this would help everyone even those who may charter on a first call basis, since eventually, you would think that first call list prices would fall as economies of scale kicked in.

    I also wonder about perhaps a next step for making this happen would be to consider some kind of restricted commercial pilot licence. This would specifically be for the sharing economy, and would be tied to being affiliated with a platform who was offering flight sharing services. In other words, the flight sharing platform would hold the appropriate certification, provided that you met the standards. pertaining to safety etc, you could fly for them. Some pilots who would qualify already would be those who do Charity angel flights.

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