Tag Archives: accident

AirplaneGeeks 364 Aviation Stories

Uzbekistan by Paul Filmer

We look at the Logbook Podcast with aviation stories told by those who lived them, Uzbekistan Airways weighing passengers, a patent for variable seat pitch, IndiGo firms up a big A320neo order, the fatality rate in GA, a Delta flight pummeled by hail, Emirates launching a 17 hour, 35 minute flight, and an interesting aircraft of the week.

Guest

Lucas Weakley

Lucas Weakley

Lucas Weakley is an Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University student in the aerospace engineering program. Fascinated by flight from a young age, he’s a builder of model rockets and airplanes, and he hopes to one day design kit-built aircraft.

Lucas is also the creator of The Logbook Podcast, where pilots and enthusiasts tell their stories of aviation. He also produced a 23-episode tutorial series for Make Magazine titled Maker Hangar that teaches you everything you need to know to build and fly three custom R/C aircraft.

We also take the opportunity to learn a little more about Embry-Riddle and the aerospace engineering program.

Learn more at Lucas Weakley’s Blog, see his videos on his YouTube channel, and follow Lucas on Twitter at @L_Weakley.

Varga Kachina

Varga Kachina

News

Airline To Weigh Passengers Before Boarding, Travel Hits New Low

Uzbekistan Airways announced on its website that they would begin weighing passengers and carry-on baggage before boarding to ensure flight safety. The airline says, “After passing check-in on flight and prior to boarding into the aircraft, we will suggest you to pass the procedure of weighing with the special weighing machine placed in the departure gate zone. The weighing record will only contain the corresponding passenger category (i.e. male/ female/ children). As for the rest, the full confidentiality of results is guaranteed.”

This idea could solve the worst thing about air travel

B/E Aerospace has filed a patent application for airline seats that are adjustable for passenger height. Shorter passengers (like children) would get less legroom. Mary Kirby would get more. B/E Aerospace manufactures aircraft cabin interior products for both commercial aircraft and business jets: seating products, galley systems, oxygen, water and waste systems; de-icing, lighting.

Airbus says it takes ‘historical’ aircraft order

IndiGo firmed up a 2014 commitment by placing an order for 250 Airbus A320 new engine option jets. IndiGo has now ordered a total of 530 A320 family aircraft.

US general aviation reports highest fatal accident rate since 1998

According to the US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), the number of general aviation flight hours is at at all time low. But in 2014 the rate of fatal GA accidents was the highest it has been since 1998.

Delta Pilots Make Blind Emergency Landing

Baseball-sized hail pummeled the airplane, shattered the nose cone and windshield. The pilots were able to land the jet safely.

Emirates Flight To Panama Will Be World’s Longest Non-Stop Route

Emirates announced its plans to launch services to Panama City, beginning 1st February, 2016, with a 17 hour 35 minute flight time.

The Airplane of the Week

The Incom T-65. (It’s David’s segment and he can do what he wants!)

Mentioned:

Short final for runway 10 at St Barths in the Caribbean

Short final for runway 10 at St Barths in the Caribbean

Landing at St Barthelemy Airport (SBH-TFFH) | PrivateFly – Video of a DHC-6-300 Twin Otter landing at St Barts.

Crazy Cockpit Landing at St. Barths – Landing runway 10 at St. Barthelemy aboard a Winair DHC-6 Twin Otter.

The Aviation Historian – The modern journal of classic aeroplanes and the history of flying.

American Airlines’ New First Class Pet Cabins – From the Fly and Dine blog in Boarding Area by Jason Kessler.

U.S.-China aviation talks hit stumbling block on airport access – The US and China have been negotiating over limits on flights between the United States and China. The U.S. is worried its airlines will be get less attractive time slots for take-off and landing than the Chinese airlines. So the US negotiators won’t move forward until China looks at a different slot allocation system.

Men In Black Safety Defenders #AirNZSafetyVideo – It’s got international rugby stars, members of the All Blacks, even Rip Torn from MIB 1 and 2, and Frank the pug!

Credit

Uzbekistan Airways photo (c) and courtesy Paul Filmer.

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.

 

AirplaneGeeks 357 Einar Enevoldson and the Perlan Project

 

Perlan Project

Perlan Project aims to soar to 90,000 feet in a glider, a sightseeing crash in Alaska, United buys into Azul Brazilian Airlines, China building airport infrastructure, news media companies start drone testing, OneGo to offer flights for a fixed monthly fee, and Solar Impulse leaves Japan.

Guest

Einar Enevoldson is a lifelong glider pilot and a former NASA test pilot.

In 1992, Einar first envisioned the Perlan Project when a LIDAR image was shown of a stratospheric mountain wave at 75,000 feet above Northern Scandinavia. Einar believed that these mountain waves could be used to fly a sailplane to great heights.

The Perlan Project is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit aeronautical exploration and atmospheric science research organization that utilizes sailplanes (gliders) designed to fly at extremely high altitudes.

Einar and Steve Fossett proved their concept when they set a world altitude record for gliders of 50,671 feet on August 30, 2006. They flew the Perlan I, a modified DG505M, in stratospheric mountain waves generated by the Polar Vortex over el Calafate, Argentina.

In July 2014, Airbus Group became the partner and title sponsor of Airbus Perlan Mission II.

Sometime in 2015/16 the Airbus Perlan Mission II intends to set new altitude records by flying a purpose-built pressurized high-altitude glider higher than any other manned wing borne aircraft has ever flown in sustained flight using stratospheric mountain waves and the polar vortex. Perlan Project intends to use the Airbus Perlan Mission II to expand their educational programmes by creating more partnerships and forming an international education committee.

YF-12A

YF-12A

Einar’s military service includes test pilot on the Hunter, Lightning, and Javelin British fighter aircraft from 1966 to 1967. Following that, Einar was a NASA research pilot at the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California. Among the many planes he flew for NASA were the YF-12A (Interceptor version of the SR-71), the oblique wing AD-1, the Controlled Deep Stall Sailplane, and the X-24B Lifting Body. He was twice awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal.

X-24B

X-24B

News

Eight Holland America Guests Die in Alaska “Flightseeing” Accident

Eight passengers and the pilot died when their “flightseeing” DeHavilland DHC-3T Turbine Otter crashed into a rock face about 20 from Ketchikan, Alaska. The floatplane was providing a tour for passengers from Holland America Line’s MS Westerdam cruise ship. The wreckage is on a 60 degree slope at the base of a mountainside cliff.

Azul by Paul Flimer

Azul by Paul Flimer

United Airlines to pay $100 mln for Azul stake, for foothold in Brazil

Azul Brazilian Airlines is the third largest airline in Brazil, and was founded in 2008 by Brazilian-born David Neeleman, who also founded JetBlue Airways. Neeleman is Azul’s chief executive. United would gain access to Brazilian cities. Azul gets investment money where they have been unable to offer an initial public offering due to Brazil’s poor economy.

China’s aviation boom drives airport building frenzy

More than 60 inland airports in China are expanding, and another 30 new regional airports are  being built. The Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC), says more than $80 billion will be invested in aviation projects this year alone. Driving this are business travel and outbound tourism.

News Coalition Launches Hands-On Drone Testing Program with Virginia Tech

Fifteen news media companies launched research testing of sUAS for news gathering in partnership with Virginia Tech, one of the six FAA UAS test sites. Flight tests will include a series of scenarios to simulate news gathering with small UAVs.

OneGo Will Offer Unlimited West Coast Flights For $1,500 A Month

Startup OneGo wants to offer this service to small and medium businesses where team members have to do a lot of travel. In exchange for the fixed monthly fee, travelers will get unlimited economy class direct flights on major airlines like American, Delta, United and Virgin America, as well as Gogo WiFi membership, and enrollment in TSA Pre for faster security screenings.

Solar Impulse Crossing The Pacific

Solar Impulse 2 finally launched from Nagoya, Japan, en route to Hawaii. The flight is expected to take five days.

The Australia News Desk

Grant’s holding together with cold and flu medicine long enough to get an AusDesk recorded with Steve covering:

Mentioned

  • Flight Threats – An iOS app designed as a situational awareness improvement tool for pilots.

Patrick Wiggins 50th anniversary jump

Courtesy of Skydive Utah: NASA Ambassador Patrick Wiggins, 66, is no stranger to the sky with about 760 jumps under his belt as he logs another while stepping out of a Skydive Utah plane near Tooele. On Friday the education assistant at the University of Utah donned his original 1965 “antique parachute” and gear to mark the 50th anniversary of his first jump while joining friends at Skydive Utah, at the Tooele Valley Airport in Erda.

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.

 

AirplaneGeeks 354 Controlling the Airport Conversation

Chino Airport

Chino Airport Community Ambassador Bob Velker, an alternative to radar, smaller airline carry-on bags, an update on the A400M crash, shooting wildlife from a plane, and two airlines make a top 10 list that you don’t want to be on.

Guest

Bob Velker is Business Liaison & Community Outreach Manager, Chino Airport (CNO), County of San Bernardino – Department of Airports.

We talk with Bob about his role as the “community ambassador” for Chino Airport, one of the country’s largest general aviation airports and located in the County of San Bernardino, close to Los Angeles, Orange, and Riverside counties in Southern California.

His primary task is to dispel the notion that Chino Airport is a “gated community filled with rich boys and their toys.” More precisely, that Chino is a small business park with runways, made up of dozens of businesses, employing hundreds of people, and pouring millions of dollars into the local economy.

Bob tells us how he builds synergy for all the airport stakeholders: the developers, the community, the Planes of Fame Air Museum, area businesses, and the airport itself. He creates education and awareness programs that engage the community with the airport and help them see the important role the airport plays in the local economy.

Chino Airshow

We also talk about the Planes of Fame Airshow and the notion of an “aerotropolis,” where an airport is in the center of a city which then grows around it, connecting workers, suppliers, executives, and goods to the global marketplace. Bob gives us a great example of how an airport can work with drone flyers for their mutual benefit.

Bob has been in-and-around Chino Airport for 18 years. He’s also a pilot, a businessman, a strategic planner, and a management consultant, plus, he says, a recovering engineer.

Reporting directly to the county’s Director of Airports, Bob’s role also requires a close working relationship with local governments, elected officials, chambers of commerce, community service organizations, local school districts and colleges, pilot’s groups, and high-profile businesses in and around the airport.

Bob is responsible for creating and maintaining the airport’s social media platform. Their website is ChinoAirport.org, and you can find them on Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube. The History of Chino Airport (formerly Cal Aero Field) is a video worth watching.

News

Television signals a possible alternative to radar

NATS, in conjunction with Thales ATM UK and Roke Manor, have been testing a system that uses standard TV signals to detect and direct aircraft.

Get ready for smaller airline carry-on bags

At its annual meeting, IATA (The International Air Transport Association) proposed the Cabin OK program to try and standardize the size of cabin bags allowed by airlines.

On its webpage, IATA says, “…the current variety of policies among airlines can lead to frustration for passengers. Bags that do not correspond to the allowance are regularly checked in at the gate, which adds inconvenience for the traveller, slows down the boarding process, increases airline costs and occasionally delays flights.”

The bag size proposed by IATA is a little smaller than the standard size used by most U.S. carriers, including Delta, United, American, and Southwest.

Vital engine software files accidentally wiped, linked to fatal A400M plane crash

On May 9, an Airbus A400M crashed near Spain’s Seville Airport. Four of six crew members were killed. A BBC source says investigators believe that when software was installed, the torque calibration parameters had accidentally been deleted, causing the ECU’s to fail to operate properly.

Ranchers mourn wildlife employees killed in plane crash

The pilot and a gunner were killed while attempting to shoot a coyote in northeastern New Mexico as part of the Wildlife Services program under the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).

According to the USDA, Wildlife Services resolves “wildlife conflicts to allow people and wildlife to coexist.” The Predator Defense organization takes a dim view of the USDA methodology, but nonetheless the Wildlife Services use of aerial gunning has led to a number of accidents and deaths.

10 Companies That Act Like They Hate Their Customers

The list of major corporations with terrible customer service includes cable companies, telecommunications companies, banks, insurance companies, and (no surprise) two U.S. airlines.

The Australia News Desk

In order to prevent a Rob Mark moment on the Oz Desk, Grant has to pass Steve’s Breathalyzer test before he can join in reporting on:

  • Qantas and American teaming up on the SYD-LAX route allowing Qantas to redeploy some 747-400s to the SYD-SFO route
  • Alan Joyce joins the chorus of howls against the government’s proposed northern cabotage reductions.

The Aviation Minute

Rob Mark has been watching the growth of commercial and hobby drone use, and provides his thoughts on some of the technology being employed.

Mentioned

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.

AirplaneGeeks 343 Germanwings Flight 9525

Germanwings A320

Implications of the Germanwings Flight 9525 crash: two in the cockpit, pilot mental fitness, release of information, and media speculation. Also, a great conversation with a pilot and doctor who flies medical staff and supplies into rural Mexico.

Guest

Dr. Michael Budincich is a Doctor of Chiropractic and he is passionate about flying and about aiding those who are less fortunate. “Dr. Bud” combines these by flying doctors and medical supplies into rural clinics in the Baja California Peninsula of Mexico.

For many years, Dr. Bud has been a member of the “Flying Samaritans,” bringing free chiropractic care to disadvantaged people in Mexico. He is also a member of several “flying doctor” groups such as LIGA (Flying Doctors of Mercy). He works with Missions of Baja as a missionary pilot, translator, and chiropractor. Dr. Bud has treated thousands of impoverished Mexican nationals and flown much needed medications, clothing and supplies to the clinics of Baja.

We talk with Dr. Bud about how he came to be involved with the Flying Samaritans and serving clinics in Mexico. We hear about the challenges of flying doctors and supplies into unimproved strips in Baja, as well as the roles for pilots, doctors, associated professions, translators, and even administrators. Dr. Bud formed Manos Con Alas Ministries, his own non-profit to bring volunteer doctors to Mexico, and flew humanitarian missions in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake.

Airstrip at Bahia de Los Angeles, or Bay of LA

Airstrip at Bahia de Los Angeles, or Bay of LA

Dr. Bud is a founding member of the Academy of Forensic and Industrial Chiropractic Consultants (FAFICC) and has held elected offices within the local, county and state chapters of the California Chiropractic Association for many years. Dr. Bud is also a state appointed “Qualified Medical Examiner” and a past examiner for the California State Board of Chiropractic Examiners, the state’s licensing body. His website is DrBud.com.

News

The investigation into the causes for the crash of Germanwings Flight 9525 is still underway, and the media is delivering a great deal of speculative information. Nevertheless, there are some related topics that we discuss in a general way:

  • Release of information while the investigation is underway
  • Ensuring the mental fitness of airline pilots
  • A “two in the cockpit” rule
  • Cockpit video
  • “Crash proofing” technology

See these articles for more opinion and information:

The Australia News Desk

Grant’s back from an exhausting week working on hot air balloons while Steve’s feeling relaxed. Lucky him!

Mentioned

Bonus

Lionheart on Final to Moontown

Lionheart on final to Moontown (3M5) by Jamie Dodson. Taken March 28th, 2015 at Moontown Alabama, 7 Miles east of Huntsville.

Credit

Germanwings A320 photo courtesy Alec Wilson from Khon Kaen, Thailand.

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.

 

AirplaneGeeks 330 The Rogue Aviator

Ace Abbott

Memoirs of a pilot, AirAsia Flight QZ8501, flying drones safely, falling oil prices and the cost of airline tickets, the Gulfstream G650ER, a look back at 2014 and a look ahead to 2015.

Guest

Ace Abbott was an F-4 Phantom pilot in the USAF, based in the Far East, and he flew the Learjet as a corporate and charter pilot. During the last 22 years of his career, Ace flew the Boeing 727 for several airlines, accumulating 11,000 hours in the captain’s chair.

Ace is retired now, he blogs, and he authored his memoir, The Rogue Aviator In the Back Alleys of Aviation. and Dead Tired: Aviation’s Insidious Killer which looks at pilot fatigue.

Ace was featured by two young aviation bloggers: Share Your Story: Ace Abbott, Author, F-4 Phantom and 727 Pilot by Swayne Martin and Ace Abbott – His Story by Jake Lewis.

Find Ace’s books, blog and more at The Rogue Aviator. Follow Ace on Twitter: @aceabbott.

News

Update on AirAsia 8501 Accident

AirAsia Flight 8501 was flying from Surabaya, Indonesia, to Singapore with 162 souls onboard: 155 passengers, 2 pilots, and 5 crew. State-owned AirNav Indonesia provides air-navigation services and said the AirAsia plane took off at 5:32 a.m. local time. While cruising at 32,000 feet at 6:12 a.m., it contacted traffic control at Jakarta’s airport to say it was moving left from the flight path and rising to 38,000 feet to avoid a cloud. At 6:18 a.m. QZ8501 disappeared from radar.

UK Body Warns Drone Owners: Fly Safely, or You’ll Be Fined

The UK civil aviation authority reminds people that if you fly recklessly you can be fined as much as 5,000 pounds.

Know Before You Fly

An education campaign founded by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI), the Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA), and the Small UAV Coalition in partnership with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to educate prospective users about the safe and responsible operation of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS).

Why Only Some Airline Tickets Are Falling With Lower Oil Prices

Oil prices have plummeted, and fuel is the big cost element for airlines. So does that mean that ticket prices will fall as well? Not necessarily. Different airline fuel hedging strategies play a role.

See also: Major US Airlines That Took Risky Bets On Oil Are Hurting From Falling Prices and Airfare Should Get Cheaper In 2015 Due To Plummeting Oil Prices, Experts Say.

Airlines We Lost in 2014

The Cranky Flier looks at the airlines that in 2014 went out of business, were bought, or retired.

The Newest Version Of The $66.5 Million G650 Can Fly Nonstop From New York To Hong Kong

The Gulfstream G650ER can carry an extra 4,000 pounds of fuel which increases range to 8,600 miles, enough to fly nonstop from New York to Hong Kong or Los Angeles to Melbourne, Australia.

David Vanderhoof’s History Segment

This week Jamie Dodson tells us about the Convair B-36 “Peacemaker.”

B-36J AF Serial Number 52-2217 on display at the Strategic Air and Space Museum.

B-36J AF Serial Number 52-2217 on display at the Strategic Air and Space Museum.

B-36J AF Serial Number 52-2220 on display in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force

B-36J AF Serial Number 52-2220 on display in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force

B-36J AF Serial Number 52-2827 on display at the Pima Air & Space Museum.

B-36J AF Serial Number 52-2827 on display at the Pima Air & Space Museum.

Airplane Geeks on Ice

LC-130s and a Turbine DC-3 on skis at Williams Field (NZWD) McMurdo Antarctica

LC-130s and a Turbine DC-3 on skis at Williams Field (NZWD) McMurdo Antarctica

Juan Carlos Fernandez Diaz is part of a scientific crew flying in Antarctica. He created the website Listener Reports from an Airplane Geek from McMurdo Station Antarctica and sends us his first report on aviation from that continent.

Mentioned

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.

 

AirplaneGeeks 323 A Solar-Electric Airplane

Aero Electric Aircraft Corporation (AEAC)

The Sun Flyer solar-electric General Aviation airplane, the FAA and GA accidents, the SpaceShipTwo accident, the Ford bomber plant, and the last MD-11 passenger flight.

Guest

George Bye is CEO of Bye Aerospace and also Chairman of AEAC, the Aero Electric Aircraft Corporation which was created to produce and market the Aero Electric “Sun Flyer,” a two seat solar-electric general aviation aircraft.

George is an ATP rated pilot who has logged over 4,000 flying hours. He was a USAF instructor pilot in the Northrop T-38 Talon, a C-141B Aircraft Commander, and he is a Desert Storm veteran.

George has developed a number of aircraft and technologies, including electric and solar UAVs, and the Javelin, that beautiful two-seat jet that was intended for military training as well as civil use.

We talk with George about the technology and the economic imperative of the Sun Flyer solar electric aircraft. The current synergy of technology in aerodynamics and structure, motors, batteries, and solar cells creates the possibility of a solar electric trainer with significantly lower cost of operation.

News

USA Today: FAA, general aviation could have done more to save lives

A USA Today article titled “Investigation: Post-crash fires in small planes cost 600 lives” says that in the early 1990s the FAA proposed changes for small aircraft that would help prevent post-crash fires. But the cost of installing the equipment on new airplanes was deemed to be “too high compared to the dollar value of the lives that would be saved.” So the changes were not implemented and since 1993 604 people have died from post-crash fires.

Will Virgin Galactic’s Crash End Space Tourism?

Shortly after being released by the WhiteKnightTwo, the rocket powered SpaceShipTwo came apart, killing one of the two pilots.

Virgin Galactic was founded by Richard Branson to provide commercial space tourism. The WhiteKnightTwo airplane is powered by commercially available jet engines and carries the rocket-powered of SpaceShipTwo to altitude. SpaceShipTwo is released, fires it’s rocket motor, and shoots up to suborbital space. From there, it glides to a landing.

Before the accident, listener Trevor sent in a link to a fascinating video: Commercial Jetliner Joined by Virgin Galactic.

Yankee Air Museum Takes Ownership of Willow Run Plant

During WWII, the Ford Bomber Plant at Willow Run in Ypsilanti, Michigan produced the B-24 Liberator. Since then the facility changed owners, but now it will be saved to become a museum. The Yankee Air Museum will now become the National Museum of Aviation and Technology at Historic Willow Run.

With Last MD-11 Passenger Flight, Another Aviation Icon Goes Away

The last commercial passenger revenue flight by a McDonnell Douglas MD-11 has taken place. It was a KLM Royal Dutch Airlines flight from Montreal to Amsterdam. KLM planned events around the flight and many aviation enthusiasts were onboard.

David Vanderhoof’s Aircraft of the Week

The deHavilland Canada  DHC-7 or  DASH-7.

Rob Mark’s Aviation Minute

Rob thanks the men and women who worked tirelessly to restore ATC service after the Chicago Center fire.

Across the Pond

Matt Willis returns to talk with Pieter Johnson about Naval Air History and his latest projects including the Fairey Barracuda, a new novel, and why the P51 has so many myths surrounding it. Follow @NavalAirHistory on Twitter.

Mentioned

Australian Man Parks Wingless Airplane at Pub

From photographer Paul Filmer:

Manila Airport (RPLL) – Prop Aircraft

Beech Starships at Centennial (KAPA)

Avra Valley, AZ (KAVQ) – 2007 and 2009 (now called Marana Regional)

Silicon Valley can keep its Teslas and robotic cars: Slovakia’s AeroMobil just unveiled a flying car

AeroMobil website.

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.

AirplaneGeeks 304 – Searching Out Interesting Aircraft

MiG-29SE Fulcrum of the Bangladesh Air Force

We talk about about the USA Today general aviation safety report, airline social media strategy, the youngest person to circumnavigate Australia solo, something new in the search for MH 370, the airline market in Scandinavia, and carbon airplane brakes.

Guest

Bernie Leighton travels around the world in search of aircraft to learn about, experience, and photograph. He’s been obsessed with Russian aviation in particular since he was very young. Bernie writes his stories for AirlineReporter.com.

Bernie will go anywhere to fly on anything. He spent four years in Australia learning about how to run an airline, while putting his learning into practice by mileage running around the world. You can usually find Bernie in his natural habitat: an airport.

We talk with Bernie about some of the interesting planes he’s found and even flown on, how he selects his destinations, and photography (his collection is on Flickr). We also learn about Russian ekranoplan ground effect aircraft and where you can get your own small passenger ekranoplan, the  Aquaglide  from the Russian Arctic Trade and Transport Company. They have a video library of photographs.

Bernie has flown in a Genex AN-26 in Belarus in Eastern Europe, landing with a cargo door stuck open. He characterizes flying in Russia like this: the Russian aviation  culture is operational practicality with a respect for safety, versus Western devotion to safety at the expense of operations.

The week’s aviation news

Safety last: Lies and coverups mask roots of small-plane carnage

In the past five decades, almost 45,000 people have been killed in private planes and helicopters. Investigations have said pilots caused or at least contributed to 86% of those accidents.USA Today says their investigation shows that many accidents are caused by defective parts and dangerous designs, and manufacturers have covered up problems and lied to regulators.

Airlines: Is a Customer Service Mindset at Odds with a Social Media Culture?

Marisa Garcia writes about the airline passenger experience in her Flight Chic blog. In this post, she blogs about a discussion of airline social media strategy at the SITA IT Summit in Brussels. American Airlines has built a large, very responsive social media culture that involves many employees at many levels. JetBlue Airways seems to favor more of a traditional, face-to-face customer support strategy.

David Vanderhoof’s Aircraft of the Week

Cessna Skymaster

The Cessna 336/337 O-2A  Skymaster. Cessna’s push-me-pull-me went from Air Taxi to director of air strikes in South East Asia. The aircraft’s chainsaw buzz brings back fond memories to both Rob and David.

The Australia News Desk

This week the boys are chatting with Alex Fisher, a 17 year old who’s currently flying solo around Australia to raise funds for the Royal Flying Doctor Service and become the youngest person to circumnavigate Australia solo by aircraft in the process.

Find more information at his Flight of Solidarity website and follow him on Twitter at @fltofsolidarity.

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124.

Rob Mark’s Aviation Minute

Rob tells us about the deleted files from the MH 370 pilot’s flight simulator.

Across the Pond

This week Pieter returns to talk to Marisa Garcia about the airline market in Scandinavia. They discuss key airline and airport developments and focus on Norway. Marisa can be found at FlightChic.com.

Find Pieter on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on Facebook at XTPMedia, and at the Aviation Xtended podcast.

Mentioned

It’s a Boat… It’s a Plane… It’s BOTH

Bernie Leighton’s article and photographs in AirlineReporter.com. Read all of Bernie’s Airline Reporter articles.

Airline Pilot Guy

Captain Jeff’s excellent aviation podcast. In the listener feedback segment, Jeff gives us a good lesson on carbon brakes on airliners.

Heavens Above

This site for astronomy enthusiasts will let you find Iridium Flares, as well as lots of other information.

Pentagon IDs 17 of 52 killed in 1952 Alaskan plane crash

The remains of 17 people onboard the C-124 Globemaster which crashed in 1952 will be returned to their families.

FAA and UAS

This is a good post on why the FAA needs to get Unmanned Aerial System regulations right.

Jodi in a Top Cub

Jodi in a Top Cub

Listen to the NBAA Flight Plan podcast from the National Business Aviation Association.

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

AirplaneGeeks 289 – Airplane Geeks Unplugged

F-86H

We tackle the show without a guest, and take the opportunity to to fly largely unedited for a more raw, intimate episode.

We talk about flying ability based on gender and airliner recycling as alternative housing. On the technology front, we look at jet engine developments and the application of 3D printing to aerospace manufacturing.

Listener mail topics include aviation museums, the British Airways Future Pilot Programme, beer and wine on flights, good aviation books, and where you can buy your own bomber.

David even proposes an aviation cooking show and looks for recipes like Mitsubishi Meatballs, Boeing Bouillabaisse, Airbus Avocados, and Piasecki Pancakes. David also mentions a “dollar nineteen” airplane. Want to know what that is? Look it up on Emmanuel Gustin’s Aircraft Nicknames page.

The week’s aviation news:

In this week’s Australia Desk:

Steve and Grant are rather exhausted after the RAAF’s Centenary of Military Aviation air show at Pt Cook. They cover some topics in summary:

  • The RAAF announces the first 2 pilots they will send over to learn to fly the F35

  • Qantas confirms job losses of 5,000 & early retirement of their 767s & more 747s

  • The Boxkite replica flew at the air show & looked great (check out the video we posted to our YouTube channel & Facebook page)

From there, we then play an excerpt from Steve’s interview with Air Marshal Geoff Brown, Chief of Air Force (RAAF)

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124.

Rob Mark’s Aviation Minute: The Transportation Security Administration and Weapons.

Etihad

In this week’s Across the Pond segment:

We continue the discussion with Oussama Salah from Oussamas Take  on developments in the Middle East ….but ‘spreading worldwide’ might be a better description. In our discussion this week we wonder if Alitalia will remain in one piece and where the growth stops, as Ireland and Switzerland get added attention.

Find Pieter on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on Facebook at XTPMedia, and at the Aviation Xtended podcast.

Lancaster

Mentioned:

F4U at Pima

Listen to the NBAA Flight Plan podcast from the National Business Aviation Association.

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

AirplaneGeeks 287 – Mary Kirby and the Runway Girl Network

Runway Girl Network

Mary Kirby’s new Runway Girl Network is an online framework “where air transport intelligence meets the passenger experience.”

We talk with Mary about aircraft interiors, inflight connectivity driving operational benefits, airline seat size from a safety standpoint, and other topics that impact the passenger experience.

You’ll find content at the Runway Girl Network in four categories: passenger safety,  passenger comfort, passenger connectivity, and passenger services.

“Lean into Aviation” highlights women in the industry and their accomplishments. The “#PaxEx Forum” presents articles written by industry thought leaders. The weekly “#PaxEx Podcast” is a thirty minute program where experts join in on a conversation about current passenger experience topics.

The Network features a hybrid model with both advertising-supported free content, and subscription-based premium content. You can follow Mary on Twitter as @RunwayGirl.

The week’s aviation news:

The 247D and DC-3 at NASM

David Vanderhoof’s Aircraft of the Week: The Boeing Airplane that Created the DC-3: the B-247.

In this week’s Australia Desk:

Steve and Grant chat with Mike Yeo from The Base Leg blog about his trip to the Singapore Air Show. Topics include the A350, the 787, military display teams, China’s trade show presence but lack of airframes and general buzz from the show.

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124.

Rob Mark’s The Aviation Minute: The pilot shortage.

Monino by Paul Filmer

Monino by Paul Filmer

Mentioned:

  • Paul Filmer aviation photography. (Two photos above from Monino.)
Mitsubishi Mu-2

Mitsubishi Mu-2

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

AirplaneGeeks 283 – Aviation Accident Animation

Eyewitness Animations

Jack Suchocki (a former Eastern Airlines Captain) is President of Eyewitness Animations. They create professional forensic animations and courtroom graphics, including aviation accident reconstruction. These are used for investigations and litigation. An example is the Asiana 214 crash video they produced. The animations are accurate with respect to the events, scale, and time. Clients include U.S. Government agencies, industry manufacturers and organizations, television networks, and many others.

We talk about where the data comes from for these animations constructed on personal computers and how they are used in accident litigation.

Sky Whale

The week’s aviation news:

Douglas DC-9

David Vanderhoof’s Aircraft of the Week: the Douglas DC-9.

In this week’s Australia Desk:

  • Qantas copping a US$90k fine for not a form of tarmac stranding
  • Qantas pulls their 737s out of Hobart & sticks to 717s
  • Air India 787 lines up on Essendon GA airport instead of Melbourne airport
  • Things get even more kooky with the new Toowoomba airport, starting with its name. (Damien Rose used to live in Toowoomba and knows the area well.)

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124.

View through the glass from Barcelona Tower

View through the glass from Barcelona Tower

In this week’s Across the Pond segment:

Pieter talks to Jesús Calderon, Air Traffic Controller in the Barcelona Tower about recent changes to airfield procedures, why he is taking his ATPL exams in London and why Barcelona has been busier than Madrid this summer. We also get an insight into what an Air Traffic Controller thinks about when he takes a commercial flight as a passenger.

Find Jesús on Facebook, Pieter on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on Facebook at XTPMedia, and at the Aviation Xtended podcast.

Mentioned:

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.