Time and Navigation

David Vanderhoof was invited to be a social media participant for the opening of the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum’s new exhibit, Time and Navigation: The untold story of getting from here to there. He brings us recordings and interviews from the event.

The full selection of audio recordings, (with play times):

How did the aviators "shoot" the sun and stars?

The Winnie Mae, the airplane Wiley Post flew in his record-breaking flights around the world in 1931 and 1933

Time and Navigation: The Untold Story of Getting from Here to There, Fact Sheet:

Opening April 12, 2013, National Mall building, Gallery 213

Presented in collaboration with the National Museum of American History

Sections: Navigating at Sea; Navigating in the Air; Navigating in Space; Inventing Satellite Navigation; and Navigation for Everyone.

Sponsored by: Northrop Grumman Corporation, Exelis Inc., Honeywell, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, U.S. Department of Transportation, Magellan, National Coordination Office for Space-Based Positioning, Navigation & Timing, Rockwell Collins and the Institute of Navigation.

“Time and Navigation” explores how revolutions in timekeeping over three centuries have influenced how people find their way. Through artifacts dating from centuries ago to today, the exhibition traces how timekeeping and navigational technologies evolved to help navigators find their way in different modes of travel, in different eras and different environments. Methods are traced through the decades to show that of all the issues facing navigation, one challenge stands out: The need to determine accurate time.

Twelve Things People Might Not Know about Time and Navigation

1. Although it was possible to navigate at sea before 1700, very precise positions could not be determined without accurate time and reliable clocks.

2. The earliest sea-going marine chronometer made in the United States was produced by Bostonian William Cranch Bond during the War of 1812.

3. Calculating position only by monitoring time, speed and direction is called Dead Reckoning. Measuring movement using only internal sensors is known as Inertial Navigation. Observing the sun, moon, or stars at precise times to determine position is known as Celestial Navigation. Radio Navigation systems use radio signals to maintain a course or fix a position.

4. The first several Soviet and American spacecraft sent to the moon missed it completely and crashed on the moon or were lost in space. Subsequent missions achieved their objectives as better techniques for guidance and navigation were developed.

5. When the first men went to the moon (Apollo 8), they used a sextant to help them navigate.

6. A spacecraft travelling across the solar system navigates by means of precisely timed radio signals sent back and forth to Earth. Navigators on Earth track its location and speed and transmit course adjustments. These techniques allow navigators to guide a probe to a planetary rendezvous or a pinpoint landing.

7. Space shuttles used onboard star trackers to locate their position in space with high accuracy. Once the shuttle reached orbit, the tracker automatically locked onto a star to orient the spacecraft.

8. The fundamental unit of time, the second, was defined in the past by the rotation of the Earth. Since 1967, the second has been defined by the signature frequency of a form of the element cesium.

9. A navigator on a ship at sea 100 years ago needed to know the time to the second. GPS satellite navigation works by measuring time to billionths of a second.

10. Albert Einstein’s understanding of space and time and relativity contributed to global navigation. Because GPS satellites experience lower gravity and move at high speeds, their clocks operate at a different rate than clocks on Earth. Since all the clocks in the system must be synchronized, a net correction of 38 millionths of a second per day must be added to the satellite clock’s time.

11. Increasingly reliable clocks and improved navigation methods have allowed navigators to calculate spacecraft positions with greater accuracy. By 2012 missions could be tracked with 100,000 times the accuracy possible in the early 1960s.

12. Atomic clocks in GPS satellites keep time to within three nanoseconds—three-billionths of a second.

The week’s aviation news:

In this week’s Australia Desk:

Grant is back on deck this week as we discuss the release of the new Qantas uniforms, revealed this week to much fanfare. Eight former Royal Australian Navy Kaman SH-2G Super Sea Sprite helicopters, which never saw service after the programme was scrapped two years ago, have been purchased by the New Zealand Government for their Navy at a cost of $A200million ($NZ244million – $US210million). And keeping in the recent theme of aviation lobby groups wading into the upcoming federal election early, the Australian Airports Association is asking the government to consider backing a fund to assist struggling remote area airstrips to the tune of $20million.

Links:

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124. Australia Desk archives can be found at www.australiadesk.net.

In this week’s Across the Pond segment:

This week we look at what’s been happening in the Benelux countries and France with Frenchez Pietersz from Aviation Platform. New low cost carriers, KLM baggage fees and the threat of european hub domination from Schipol all get discussed.

Follow Aviation Platform on Twitter as @AviPlatform on Facebook and LinkedIn.

Find Pieter on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on Facebook at XTPMedia, and at the Aviation Xtended podcast.

Mentioned:

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

Igor and his Skyhawk

We talk with the grandson of aviation pioneer Igor Sikorsky about his grandfather and the annual Sikorsky Weekend that Igor holds at his sporting camp in the North Maine Woods. Igor flies a Skyhawk float plane to ferry visitors to his camp and to fishing spots in Maine.

You’ll hear stories about his grandfather – how he viewed life and those around him, his visions for the helicopter, and his interests in religion and astronomy, among others. Igor holds a great collection of historical records and memorabilia from the life of his grandfather, and he brings that out for Sikorsky Weekend. Other Sikorsky memorabilia can be found at:

Igor Sikorsky

The week’s aviation news:

The Aircraft of the Week:

David continues his series on the Skyhawk with the international versions.

In this week’s Australia Desk:

Recorded on the banks of the Yarra River in Melbourne near Princess Bridge (sheltering from the rain). We speak to Doug Worrall, an airline pilot and iPad/Android app developer, about his new game, LEO – Low Earth Orbit, available in iTunes and Google Play. Doug explains his motivation to create a challenging game that makes the user think and consider the laws of physics. The impetus for the game was his son’s school not offering physics as a subject any more, due to lack of interest.

In the news:

  • The Australian Government, after gifting 4 ex-RAAF C130-H aircraft to Indonesia, announce the sale of five additional airframes to that country.
  • Air Samoa announces a Pay For What You Weight scheme for air fares…Steve is horrified!
  • A routine go-around by a Qantas aircraft at Sydney during the week is cause for an appalling, ill-informed article on ABC News during the week. Doug explains the realities of a go-around and why they’re reasonably routine and very safe practice.

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124. Australia Desk archives can be found at www.australiadesk.net.

In this week’s Across the Pond segment:

This week we travel to Italy to talk to Federico Bossi, Air Traffic Controller in the Milan Tower. He shares his experiences as well as telling us about his passion for flight simulation. Federico is @AeroFede on Twitter.

Find Pieter on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on Facebook at XTPMedia, and at the Aviation Xtended podcast.

Mentioned:

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

At the Classic Air Force base, by Bob

Guest Anthony Nalli is the Executive Producer / President of FourPoints Television Productions, which brings us The Aviators. This TV series has a weekly viewership of ten million and their fourth season comes out later this year.

We talk about how The Aviators got started, how it covers pretty much everything that flies, and where the story ideas come from. Plus we get a little taste of what to expect in future episodes.

The Aviators is not geared strictly for pilots and aviation enthusiasts – the content appeals to others as well. Find them on most PBS stations, in iTunes, Hulu, and Amazon on Demand. Follow them at @TheAviatorsTV on Twitter and see their Facebook and YouTube pages.

The Aircraft of the Week:

David continues his series on the Skyhawk with the A-4E though M, and the Two Holers.

The week’s aviation news:

In this week’s Australia Desk:

The ACCC finally grant approval for the Qantas & Emrates tie-up, and not a moment too soon as a celebratory flyover of Sydney by two A380s – one from each carrier – in formation was operated four days later to mark the commencement. In other news, its smiles all round at Virgin Australia as their pilot unions signed off on a new enterprise agreement which will see increased job security and pay rises between 14.2% and 28.4%. We also get an explanation of how Grant is not a weed wacker.

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124. Australia Desk archives can be found at www.australiadesk.net.

Rosetta swings by EarthRosetta swings by Earth

In this week’s Across the Pond segment:

This week’s Across The Pond is a Bits and Pieces episode. Pieter talks about how he finds his guests and what’s exciting in the world of Space exploration and travel.

See:

Find Pieter on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on Facebook at XTPMedia, and at the Aviation Xtended podcast.

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

Qatar Airways 787 DreamlinerQatar Airways 787 Dreamliner

Jon Ostrower, Aerospace Beat Reporter for The Wall Street Journal returns as our guest. We talk with Jon about the Boeing press briefing in Tokyo where they annoyed the NTSB over 787 battery issues. Jon attended the International Society of Transport Aircraft Trading (ISTAT) Americas Conference and we get his impressions from that event, including industry concern about the sustainability of the huge narrowbody order volume in light of uncertainty about the future economic situation.

We discuss Airbus progress on the A350 widebody (will we see it for the Paris Air Show?) and a larger Bombardier CSeries that starts to encroach on 737/A320 class airliners. Their test aircraft strategy employs a bit of concurrent flight testing. We also talk about the operating economics of old aircraft versus the new fuel efficient planes.

Follow Jon on Twitter as @JonOstrower, visit his Facebook page and his photos on Flicker.

The week’s aviation news:

In this week’s Australia Desk:

The Regional Aviation Association of Australia calls for more assistance from Canberra for the increasingly struggling regional sector…but receives a less than favourable response from Canberra

Fiji Airways (formerly Air Pacific) launches the first of three new A330s, which will replace its ageing fleet of B747-400s

Grant speculates about the LionAir’s possible plans to enter the Australian market

A minor fire in the Melbourne ATC Centre causes an evacuation and delays in the skies over south eastern Australia during the week,

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124. Australia Desk archives can be found at www.australiadesk.net.

In this week’s Across the Pond segment:

In memory of Sub Lieutenant Derrik Armson, Barracuda Pilot in the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm. See Naval Air History and follow @navalairhistory.

Find Pieter on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on Facebook at XTPMedia, and at the Aviation Xtended podcast.

Ryan’s Su-30MKK Flanker G 1:72 scale modelRyan’s Su-30MKK Flanker G 1:72 scale model

Mentions:

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

flybe at Southampton Airportflybe at Southampton Airport

Robert W. Poole, Jr. is the founder of the Reason Foundation, a free market think tank that conducts public policy research. He has been a long time advocate of air traffic control system reform.

We talk to Bob about the recent World ATM Congress in Madrid and the ATC Global 2013 conference in Amsterdam where his presentation Why Not Call it “Privitization”? being delivered by Graham Lake. Bob reflects on how Nav Canada, the Canadian civil air navagation services provider, represents a good model for others, the challenges faced in the U.S. and how the budget situation affects aviation. Who is going to take action? The Government? Industry?

The Reason Foundation offers two newsletters, the Airport Policy and Aviation Security Newsletter and the Air Traffic Control Reform Newsletter, which are available at no charge upon request. Also, be sure to visit reason.tv for a variety of topical videos.

The week’s aviation news:

In this week’s Australia Desk:

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124. Australia Desk archives can be found at www.australiadesk.net.

In this week’s Across the Pond segment:

In the last of our mini series episodes from Southampton Airport we look at how social media is being used to coordinate all of the airports activities and programmes when we talk to Marketing Manager Vicky Parkes.
We are also delighted to see the recent news that Southampton Airport, branded as ‘The airport you can Breeze Through’ has smashed its targets for getting passengers through security with passengers waiting less than 5 minutes 98.2% of the time, and less than 10 minutes 99% of the time in 2012.
We would like to thank Lucy Calvert for all of her support in producing this mini series.

Useful Southampton links:

Find Pieter on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on Facebook at XTPMedia, and at the Aviation Xtended podcast.

Volunteer/Pilot Chelsea Tugaw explains preflighting Upper Limit's R22Volunteer/Pilot Chelsea Tugaw explains preflighting Upper Limit’s R22 

Mentions:

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

David rides with the Geico Skytypers in the SNJ-2
David rides with the Geico Skytypers in the SNJ-2

Our guest this episode is Keith Smith, the Founder and CEO of PilotEdge, which connects your flight simulator to live PilotEdge Air Traffic Controllers. Keith is also an instrument rated pilot and regularly flies a Lancair 360 out of Lincoln Park, NJ.

PilotEdge provides real ATC as you fly your sim, so you are interacting with controllers and other planes and thus flying with real consequences. It’s not synthetic ATC playing in the background. These are active duty Controllers, retired Controllers, and experts culled from other FS virtual networks.

PilotEdge brings a flight simulator to the next level for hobbyists, student pilots, professional pilots, flight training facilities, and airlines looking to increase simulation realism to improve training.

Along the way, Keith provides some good tips for those looking to get started in flight simulation and learning ATC.

Find PilotEdge on the Web at PilotEdge.net. You can also watch and listen to Keith’s approach and Fisk Runway 27 landing for 2012 Airventure at Oshkosh.

The week’s aviation news:

In David’s This Week in Aviation segment:

David describes his experience flying with the Geico Skytypers in the SNJ-2, also called the T-6 Texan and the Harvard.

In this week’s Australia Desk report:

GippsAero to commence manufacturing the GA-8 Airvan in the USA, Draken International purchases eight additional ex-RNZAF A4-K Skyhawks to use for training operations in the US, Indonesia to purchase six extra ex-RAAF C130H aircraft in addition to the four already gifted to them, full body scanners to be introduced at Australian airports from November.

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124. Australia Desk archives can be found at www.australiadesk.net.

In this week’s Across the Pond segment:

Pieter reflects on Airport Security. Are they doing a good or a bad job given some of the challenges they face. He gives some amusing and also worrying examples of where it goes wrong and then comes to the conclusion………….well listen in and find out.

Find Pieter on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on his blog Alpha Tango Papa, on Facebook at XTPMedia, and at the Aviation Xtended podcast.

Mentions:

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

Stirling Corkscrew Evasion by Simon W. Atack

Guest David Allen produces the great video podcast Other People’s Airplanes, where he takes you with him on flights in, well, other people’s airplanes. He also co-hosts the popular Pilot’s Flight PodLog, a hangar flying podcast. Follow David on Twitter as @DaveFlys.

We talk about how David uses multiple GoPro cameras mounted on the airplane to capture an immersive in-cockpit video experience, and some exciting changes coming to the Pilot’s Flight PodLog. David has also seen the first rough cut of the documentary film, A Pilot’s Story and he gives us a little taste of that. This will be a DVD that we’ll all want to own when it becomes available. David tells us what it takes to do what he does, and how you can too. Also, if you stick with the show, you’ll hear where the handle Ducky came from.

The week’s aviation news:

In this week’s Australia Desk report: In this week’s Australia Desk report: Grant has been to an air show without Steve! Air New Zealand announces job cuts following low profit figures, Air New Zealand confirms the purchase of two additional 787-9s, Virgin Australia announces profit increase of 118% on same time last year, RAAF may reconsider purchase of C27J Spartans – Airbus Military keen to sell them C295s instead.

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124.

This week on the Across The Pond segment, Pieter Johnson talks to Simon Atack, one of the world’s greatest aviation artists. We find out how Simon starting drawing and painting aeroplanes and what inspires him to keep producing his amazing pictures.

You can find Simon Atack on Twitter at @SimonWAtack on the Web at www.simonatack.com, and on Facebook. Pieter can be found on Twitter as @Nascothornet or XTP Media’s Facebook Page.

Mentioned in the episode:

Links from listeners:

Isaac’s Seattle links:

Opening and closing music is provided by Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at http://www.brotherloverocks.com/.

Air Australia by Ryan Hothersall

Our guest this episode is Joe Bellino, a retired Air Traffic Controller. He was with the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization (PATCO) and after the 1981 Controllers strike he became the local union rep for the new National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA). Joe was a regional union VP from 1986 to 1990, and also the Executive VP of NATCA from 1991 to 1994.

We talk about NextGen ATC, controller fatigue, types of people who make good controllers and how to test them (or not) for native ability, aircraft separation, and other air traffic control topics.

The week’s aviation news:

In this week’s Australia Desk report: Air Australia goes bankrupt only three months after re-branding from Strategic, leaving 4,000 passengers stranded and 96,000 ticket holders wondering if they’ll get any refund. We’re joined by senior aviation journalist Ben Sandilands as we discuss the events and what led up to them. The news provided a perfect diversion for Qantas CEO Allan Joyce, as he delivered very poor profit figures and announced 500 job cuts during the week.

Find Ben Sandilands online at Plane Talking and follow him on Twitter as @planetalking. Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124.

On Across The Pond this week, Pieter talks to James Cliff, PR Executive and Commentator for the Blades Display Team, one of Europes best aerobatic display teams.

You can find The Blades team on Twitter at @thebladesteam on the Web at www.theblades.biz, and on Facebook as The Blades Aerobatic Team. Pieter can be found on Twitter as @Nascothornet or XTP Media’s Facebook Page.

Mentioned in the episode:

White 767s at Dulles maps.google.com 38.942792,-77.449264

Links from listeners:

Opening and closing music is provided by Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at http://www.brotherloverocks.com/.

National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center

Guest Vicki Portway is Head of Web & New Media for the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. We talk about the Museum’s online outreach, the fantastic Become a Pilot Day in June, and the Space Shuttle Discovery target arrival of April 17 at Dulles Airport and transfer to the Udvar-Hazy Center April 19, replacing the Enterprise, which goes to the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York City.

You can find the National Air and Space Museum on Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, and Twitter. Vicki is on Twitter as sluggernova.

The week’s aviation news:

David’s Aircraft of the Week is the Supermarine Attacker.

In this week’s Australia Desk report, Steve is back from vacation, Rob Fyfe announces his pending retirement as CEO of Air New Zealand, Qantas announces Carbon Tax related fare rises (Steve vents about the Carbon Tax), Qantas credit rating downgrade, and Grant tries the mood detecting music machine one last time.

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124.

On Across The Pond this week, Pieter talks to Dave Lees, Managing Director of Southampton Airport in the UK. Dave explains to us how he will make Southampton already one of the UK’s highest performing regional airports, even better.

You can find Southampton Airport on Twitter at @SOU_Airport and at www.southamptonairport.com. Pieter can be found on Twitter as @Nascothornet or XTP Media’s Facebook Page.

Mentioned in the episode:

 

Milestones of Flight, Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum

Follow the @AirplaneGeeks on Twitter and on Facebook, send us email at thegeeks@airplanegeeks.com, or leave a message on our listener line: (361) GEEKS01.

Opening and closing music is provided by Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at http://www.brotherloverocks.com/.

 

200 person jump at Perris Valley Airport by Stephen Tornblom

Martin Rottler returns as our guest. Martin is now an Aviation Lecturer at the Center for Aviation Studies at The Ohio State University. He recently completed an internship with Korean Air in Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA), and participated in a summer program through Korea Aerospace University. We talk about NextGen, pilot training in the modern age, what gets trained in simulators and what doesn’t, cockpit management, industry networking as a component of your career development, and other topics.

Find Martin on Twitter as MartinRottler, or on his new webpage at martinrottler.net. The Center for Aviation Studies tweets as cas_osu and can also be found on Facebook.

The week’s aviation news:

In this week’s Australia Desk Report, Grant talks about CASA audits and what DAMP means, Qantas dispute worsens with five airplanes grounded due to industrial action, Jetstar staff also taking industrial action, and Virgin Australia happy to take the surplus pax from Qantas.

Find the boys down under at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124.

This week on Across the Pond, Pieter talks to Jelle Hieminga from the popular VC10 segment. Jelle is a Qualified Flight Instructor with a frozen ATPL License and talks to us about the general aviation scene in Holland and what its like to fly in Dutch airspace. Jell can be found at www.vc10.net.

On this week’s Grill the Geeks segment, Rob nails the listener questions.

Mentions:

Follow the @AirplaneGeeks on Twitter and on Facebook, send us email at thegeeks@airplanegeeks.com, or leave a message on our listener line: (361) GEEKS01.

Opening and closing music is provided by Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at http://www.brotherloverocks.com/.

ga('create', 'UA-42766644-1', 'airplanegeeks.com'); ga('send', 'pageview');