Tag Archives: EASA

611 Aviation News

Boeing 737 MAX certification flight tests, Airbus job eliminations, updated airline COVID-19 health safety protocol requirements, Aeromexico bankruptcy, NBAA convention cancellation, concept of operations for Urban Air Mobility, possible Ryanair 737 MAX buy, Austrian Airlines to operate rail service, 2018 uncontained engine failure report, geared turbofan engine replacements, and yellow warning cards at Alaska Airlines.

Aviation News

What’s Trending in Aerospace – July 5, 2020

Boeing and FAA complete certification flight testing for the 737 MAX. A review of the data gathered from flight testing will be performed and a new Airworthiness Directive for 737 MAX operators will be published allowing a return to service. Also, Airbus plans to eliminate up to 15,000 jobs by the Summer of 2021. EASA has updated airline COVID-19 health safety protocol requirements including mandated aircraft cleaning and disinfecting. Aeromexico has filed for bankruptcy. NBAA canceled the Oct. 6-8, 2020 Business Aviation Convention and Exhibition in Orlando, Florida. FAA has released Concept of Operations V1.0 for Urban Air Mobility.

Distressed Is Best As Ryanair Plans New 737 MAX Order With Boeing Amid Coronavirus Downturn

Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary believes it’s a buyer’s market for the 737 MAX. “We’re in active negotiations now with Boeing for a MAX 10 order,” he said. Any deal is expected to close after the 737 MAX returns to service. Ryanair says they operate “a fleet of over 450 Boeing 737-800 series aircraft, with orders of up to 210 new Boeing 737 aircraft. This includes 135 new Boeing 737 MAX 200s, and options for 75 more MAX 200s, which will enable Ryanair to grow its fleet to 585 by 2024… The average age of the Ryanair fleet is approximately 6.5 years, and is set to get younger with the latest aircraft order.”

Struggling Austrian Airlines swaps planes for trains

Under the recent €600 million ($680m) government aid package for Australian Airlines, the airline must reduce domestic emissions by 50% by 2050. It must also end flights where there is a direct train connection to the airport that takes “considerably less than three hours.” To help meet these requirements, Austrian will discontinue its flight between Vienna and Salzburg and instead operate rail service.

Pratt & Whitney Training Cited in 2018 United Jet Engine Failure

In 2018, a United Airlines 777-200 with PW4077 engines flying from San Francisco to Honolulu experienced an uncontained engine failure when a fan blade broke loose. The National Transportation Safety Board’s final report points to a training issue and says two previous blade inspections revealed weakened material in the titanium blade. But the inspector interpreted the indications as to the way the blade was painted. The NTSB said P&W didn’t create specific training for inspectors or certify how they performed the work.

Pratt & Whitney  to replace  old,  faulty engines before deadline

A320neo airplanes powered by older geared turbofan engines have been problematic for Indian airlines IndiGo and GoAir. Pratt is replacing those engines against an August 31, 2020 deadline, and says it will complete the job before that date.

Alaska Airlines threatens unmasked fliers with yellow cards

In July 2020 Alaska Airlines flight attendants will use yellow warning cards with passengers who fail to comply with the airline’s in-flight face mask policy. Under the new system, any passenger who “repeatedly refuses” to keep a mask on will be handed a yellow card by a flight attendant. “With that warning … the guest’s travel with us will be reviewed and could be suspended for a period,” Alaska said.

Mentioned

Van Sant Airport

Photo by David Vanderhoof

Photo by David Vanderhoof

Takeoff and landing competition a boost for pilots and a small airfield in Dover-Foxcroft

Chapter 141 EAA Facebook page

Career Spotlight: A Noble Calling. Teach for a living. Article about Max Trescott in Flight Training Magazine.

NASA’s Lunar Loo Challenge

Shuttleworth

Wings Over Wairarapa Air Festival 2021

Ninth Triennial International Aircraft Fire and Cabin Safety Research Conference

This conference is the ninth in a series of triennial international conferences established to inform the international aviation community about recent, ongoing, and planned research activities in transport category airplane fire and cabin safety.  This conference is for anyone with an interest in aircraft fire and cabin safety research.  Past attendees have included aviation safety professionals in the areas of engineering, design, airplane operations, maintenance, and research. The conference is jointly sponsored by the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), the National Civil Aviation Agency – Brazil (ANAC), the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS), Transport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA), and the Japan Civil Aviation Bureau (JCAB). Conference registration is free and available online at https://www.fire.tc.faa.gov/Meetings/meetings.asp.  A special group hotel rate of $59 (US $) per night plus taxes/fees has been established.  Hotel reservations available at https://bit.ly/2KvQsvv.

504 Honeywell Chief Test Pilot

Our guest is the chief test pilot for Honeywell Aerospace. In the news, we look at 737-700 freighters, folding wingtips for the 777X, and an online general aviation community from the European Aviation Safety Agency.

The B757 flight test aircraft. Courtesy Honeywell Aerospace.

The B757 flight test aircraft. Courtesy Honeywell Aerospace.

Guest

Joe Duval, chief test pilot for Honeywell Aerospace.

Joe Duval, the chief test pilot for Honeywell Aerospace.

Joe Duval is the chief test pilot and site leader for Honeywell Aerospace Flight Test Operations at Sky Harbor in Phoenix, Arizona.

Honeywell Aerospace produces a wide variety of components and systems for general and business aviation, commercial aviation, and military aircraft, as well as for space applications. That includes avionics, engine controls, APUs, and propulsion engines, including those from the legacy companies Garrett and Lycoming.

As chief test pilot, Joe is responsible for all flight test engineering efforts, development and strategy, and maintaining technical and programmatic excellence across a team of engineers, technicians, mechanics, and pilots. He pilots Honeywell’s Boeing 757 and Convair 580 aircraft and participates in flight tests on other aircraft in Honeywell’s fleet.

Before joining Honeywell, Joe served as a research and test pilot with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory Flight Facility. He designed and flew flight test profiles for emerging technology in government and commercial applications.

Joe also served in the United States Air Force as a pilot on the C-130 and B-707 (VIP) aircraft. He eventually became the chief pilot for the flight department responsible for the transportation of the general officer and staff of Special Operations Command. He also served as the chief of safety for the same department and is trained as an accident investigator.

Joe has over 7,000 hours flying time as a pilot and flight engineer in multiple aircraft and holds FAA type ratings in eight aircraft. He has a Bachelor’s of Science from Oregon State University in software engineering. He is Honeywell’s corporate point of contact for the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. Joe also attended the National Test Pilot School in Mojave, CA and is a graduate of the Southern California Safety Institute’s Flight Safety Officer Course.

Honeywell Aerospace B757 flight test aircraft., showing the pylon for mounting test en gines.

Honeywell Aerospace B757 flight test aircraft., showing the pylon for mounting test engines.

Aviation News

Alaska Airlines’ new 737-700 Freighters Provide “Lifeline” for Many Alaska Communities

Alaska Airlines cargo fleet of high-cycle 737-400 aircraft are being replaced with 737-700 Next-Gen aircraft to converted to freighters.

Boeing’s folding wingtips get the FAA green light

The FAA has accepted Boeing’s concept for folding wings on the 777X in order to allow the aircraft to operate at existing airports. FAA approved comes in the form of Special Conditions:

[Docket No. FAA-2017-0636; Special Conditions No. 25-726-SC], Special Conditions: The Boeing Company Model 777-8 and 777-9 Airplanes; Folding Wingtips [PDF]

Video: Boeing 777X folding wingtips

EASA Launches General Aviation Community Webpage

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) created a webpage for general aviation operators. They say, “This platform is for GA enthusiast to meet and share their passion.  Keep yourself updated and share the latest news and events.” Anyone can join by registering on the EASA General Aviation page.

Listener Recording

Student pilot Nicki brings us installment #10 on learning to become a pilot.

Interview

Brian spoke with Breeze Anderson from Helistream about their helicopter services. HeliStream offers many leisure and professional services, including scenic tours and sunset dinner rides. HeliStream also offers aerial photography, charters, and utility services.

Mentioned

Aviation Week’s Check 6 podcast, The Wild Ride at Uber’s Elevate Summit.

New England Air Museum

Cirrus Pilot Proficiency Program

Hangar 24 Craft Brewing

From Jamie Dodson, author of the award-winning Nick Grant Adventures Series, and Hunting the Wind: Pan American World Airways’ Epic Flying Boat Era, 1929–1946, available for pre-order.

Credit

Outtro by Bruno Misonne from The Sound of Flaps.

441 Airlines, Destinations, and Strapping Yourself to the Perimeter Fence

This episode, we talk to aviation and travel-industry expert Chris Kjelgaard about new Lufthansa and Iberia A350-900s, low fares from Norwegian, airlines charging fees for services, and a worrisome EASA safety report. Also, Astronics’ missed aerospace sales guidance, and the most scenic airport landings.

Guest

Chris Kjelgaard, airlines and travel industry expert

Chris Kjelgaard

Chris Kjelgaard reports on airlines and the travel-industry with more than three decades of experience. He is the founder and editor of the air and destination travel news website AirlinesAndDestinations.com. Chris also serves as editor of various print and online magazine titles, and he has written for dozens of aviation trade and consumer magazines and websites. Chris has been interviewed many times by television, radio, print, and online media on aviation and travel topics. He is a contributing editor to Runway Girl Network.

Aviation News

Inside Lufthansa’s Brand New A350-900

A Look Inside Lufthansa’s First Airbus A350-900

Iberia CCO explains carrier’s long-haul IFEC decisions

Lufthansa unveiled its new A350-900 in Munich at the beginning of February at the Lufthansa Technik hangar. This was the first of ten aircraft that are to fly from Munich to Delhi and Boston. Iberia is set to take delivery of 16 A350-900s starting in the second quarter of 2018.

Norwegian Air to offer U.S.-Europe fares starting at $65 one way

Norwegian Air Shuttle was offering $65 one way flights to Europe from some smaller US airports in New York state, and also Providence, Rhode Island, and Hartford, Connecticut. Norwegian Air spokesman Anders Lindström said, “I pay for what I want, you pay for what you want. We don’t pay for what everybody else on the plane wants.” Only a limited number of one-way tickets were offered at $65, and a return flight costs more.

More airlines are charging for everything from carry-ons to soft drinks

Airlines continue to unbundle offerings, and charge fees to add them back in. A new report by research firm Hopper sheds some light on airline ticket pricing.

EASA safety report highlights worrying increase in serious incidents

2016 was the safest year ever measured by large commercial aircraft fatal accidents, but the 2017 Preliminary Safety Review published by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) shows an increase in the number of serious incidents involving aircraft operated by carriers from the 32 EASA member states.

John King Vows Battle with the FAA to Reinstate His Medical Certificate

When it comes to aviation education and training, John King (and his wife Martha) are about as well known as anybody. But on the basis of a seizure episode in early 2014, King was denied his third-class medical certificate in November 2015. Since then he has appealed the denial, but without success. He plans to take it to an an administrative law judge at the NTSB.

First-degree murder charge filed in possible hate crime shooting at Olathe’s Austins bar

This unfortunate event has a number of connections to aviation.

Mentioned

PZL Mielec Prepares M28 – A PZL Mielec M28 twin turboprop aircraft is undertaking a two-month, 13-city tour across seven Caribbean and Latin America countries to demonstrate the M28’s all-weather operational capabilities to potential new customers, including airlines, government agencies and military operators.

Turn your friends into podcast listeners

California Black Aviation Association – A non-profit organization of aviation professionals of various ethnic backgrounds with the passion for flying and promoting aviation awareness and education through community outreach.

California Redtails – Honoring the legacy of the Tuskegee Airmen, also known as the “Redtails,” by educating, inspiring and promoting general aviation.

Embry-Riddle’s Lift, Off the Page: A Panel Discussion on Aviation Cybersecurity

Listener Submissions

Launchpad Marzari brings us another language editorial.

Xavier provides some personal thoughts on aviation from the perspective of a black pilot.

Gerry gives us his story of a memorable flight when he rode in the flight deck of a Boeing 747-400.

Credit

Intro music courtesy Brother Love from his Album Of The Year CD. Outtro by Bruno Misonne from The Sound of Flaps.