Tag Archives: F-15

448 Aerial Firefighting with the Global SuperTanker

Aerial firefighting with a Boeing 747-400, airline policies for overbooking and bumping passengers, Mar-a-Lago air restrictions for presidential visits, and F-16 fighter service life.

The Global SuperTanker in Chile for aerial firefighting operations.

The Global SuperTanker in Chile for aerial firefighting operations. Courtesy Global SuperTanker Services, LLC, (c) Bill Gabbert.

Guests

Capt. Tom Parsons, Assistant Chief Supervisor/Pilot and Scott Olson, VP Maintenance for Global SuperTanker Services, LLC. The company was formed in 2015 and acquired a B747-400 to use for aerial firefighting and other operations.

We talk about the kinds of missions the Global SuperTanker can fly, and Tom and Scott explain the aircraft modifications, the loading and delivery system, and the recent activity in Chile fighting wildfires. We also learn about the coordination required for all the air and ground participants in this kind of operation.

Related resources:

Aviation News

The passenger who was violently removed from the United Express flight operated by Republic Airways intends to take legal action. The man’s lawyer claimed his client lost two teeth and his nose was broken. We discuss the resulting media storm, airline practice of overbooking flights, and the procedure for bumping passengers.

United is promising to make major customer service changes

JetBlue Founder Backs Overbooking After United Flight Fiasco

Here’s why overbooking flights is actually a good thing

Delta CEO: Overbooking Flights is a ‘Valid Business Process’

Passengers removed from overbooked flights on US airlines – in data

The 10 Worst Airlines for Overbooking

In other news:

FAA: 5 aircraft violated Mar-a-Lago air restrictions during Trump stay

U.S. Air Force extends F-16 fighter’s service life

US Air Force chief ambivalent on F-15 Eagle retirement

Mentioned

The Organization of Black Aerospace Professionals (OBAP)

Jet engine thrust reverser examples:

Credit

Intro music courtesy Brother Love from his Album Of The Year CD. Outtro by Bruno Misonne from The Sound of Flaps.

424 A Center for Aviation Studies

The Ohio State University’s Center for Aviation Studies, a student pilot killed under mysterious circumstances, new wings for F-15C/Ds, new airline regulations, Bombardier layoffs, seat assignments by passenger size, hot props, airshow and air race reports, and a paint job that fails as a conspiracy theory.

Guest

Martin Rottler

Martin Rottler

Martin Rottler, M.S., CFI, is a Lecturer and the Industry Relations Coordinator for the Ohio State University’s Center for Aviation Studies in Columbus, OH.

Martin explains the degree programs offered for students seeking professional pilot, management, operations, airport planning, or airport management careers. We discuss the  passion for aviation that students have today, the cost of education and flight training, the pilot shortage, and accumulating hours with activities such as giving flight instruction, flying 135 cargo, and skydiving operations. Martin talks about efforts to increase student diversity, as well as pilot cadet programs in conjunction with airlines. These offer several benefits to students, including tuition reimbursement, airline company introductions, ground school, and social events.

osuAs a lecturer, Martin is primarily responsible for teaching several courses a semester and advising students. As the Center’s Industry Relations Coordinator, Martin is the primary point of contact for the program’s industry partners across all facets of the aviation industry, including airlines, business aviation, and airports.

Martin brings a variety of aviation experiences to his teaching, having worked in Corporate Flight Operations for Cirrus Aircraft in Duluth, MN and in Flight Operations Quality Assurance at Korean Air in Seoul, South Korea. He currently holds a Commercial Pilot certificate, an Instrument Rating and is a Certified Flight Instructor.

Learn more about the Ohio State University’s Center for Aviation Studies at aviation.osu.edu and follow the Center on Twitter at @cas_osu. Martin’s home page is MartinRottler.net, he’s @martinrottler on Twitter, and he’s also has on Instragram.

News

Student Pilot Killed in East Hartford Crash Died of Smoke Inhalation, Thermal Injuries

Student pilot Feras M. Freitekh, a Jordanian national, was killed and his instructor, Arian Prevalla injured when their twin-engine Piper PA-34 crashed on Main Street, in East Hartford, Connecticut. The crash site is directly across the street from Pratt & Whitney. Reportedly, Freitekh was arguing with his instructor before the flight.

AOPA Asks Supreme Court to Hear Aircraft Liability Case

In 2005, an airplane crashed after an engine failure, killing the pilot. His spouse sued the engine manufacturer, claiming a carburetor design defect. In 2014, a U.S. District Court found that there was no design defect in the carburetor because the engine was certified and approved by the FAA. A U.S. Court of Appeals reversed the decision in April 2016, ruling that FAA certification of the engine did not mean there was no design defect, and the FAA does not preempt state law standards of care as far as aviation products liability goes.

USAF looks to push F-15C/Ds out to 2045!

How do you extend the service life of F-15C/Ds to 2045? With the F-15C/D Wing Replacement Program. The new wings will be based on the F-15E production wing

With his time on Air Force One short, Obama touts new airline regulations

President Obama recently described new regulations aimed at increasing airline competition protecting customers interests. Not all airlines are in favor of these rules, which include:

  • A refund of checked bag fees if your bags are delayed
  • Airlines have to publish more information about their on-time arrivals and lost baggage
  • Protections for disabled passengers
  • Greater price transparency for online ticket platforms

Bombardier plans to shed thousands of jobs through 2018

Bombardier plans to eliminate 7,500 more jobs as part of the company’s previously announced five-year turnaround plan. The workforce reductions affect both the aircraft and rail businesses.

Hawaiian Airlines Will Continue to Assign Flight Seats Based on Passenger Weight

Federal complaints against Hawaiian Airlines claimed the airline practice of assigning seats only at the terminal discriminated against Samoans. The complaint has been denied and Hawaiian will continue the policy on flights between Honolulu and American Samoa.

The Airplane of the Week

This week, the conspiracy theorists came out to play. VFC-12 debuted a new camouflage scheme, based on the SU-34 Fullbacks seen in action over Syria. Photos of the new camo appeared first on Facebook, on a page that is dedicated to Adversary and Aggressor aircraft. The photos were then somehow hijacked into a story about the U.S. planning a “false flag” operation in Syria.

Photo by David Vanderhoof.

Photo by David Vanderhoof.

Listener Recording

Ted attended the Red Bull Air Race in Indianapolis and sent us a great audio report.

Race plane, airliner, and  helicopter at the Red Bull air race

Race plane, airliner, and helicopter at the Red Bull air race. Can you spot all three? Photo by Ted.

Mentioned

FS In Focus Show Podcast With Nick Anderson, Max Flight and Tracy Shiffman

Max Flight was a guest on the FS In Focus podcast with host Nicolas Jackson. The show aired live on Sky Blue Radio on October 15th, 2016. The episode starts with Capt. Nick from the Airline Pilot Guy podcast, then Max comes in at 1:03:00 talking jet engine technology. Tracy Shiffman from VATSIM’s Worldflight charity group starts at 1:42:00.

Goodbye, Queen of the Skies

Brian has been traveling quite a bit lately, including to Singapore and Hong Kong. He did manage to see the last flight of the Cathay 747.

Huntington Beach Airshow

img_0497_600

Back in California, Brian caught the Huntington Beach Airshow and recorded an interview with Staff Sgt Danny Wolfram of the United States Air Force. He was entertained by the “Screamin Sasquatch,” a biplane with a jet engine.

Screamin' Sasquatch

Screamin’ Sasquatch

Applications Open for EAA Founder’s Innovation Prize

Do You Know Your Canary? [PDF] on the FAA Portable Reduced Oxygen Training Enclosure program.

Jodi Brommer and the Model 61 Long-EZ

Jodi Brommer and the Model 61 Long-EZ

Goolwa to Bankstown via Griffith Oct 2016 photo journal from Mark Newton.

Paul Filmer visited North Korea for the airshow and came back with some amazing photographs. Find some at Global Aviation Resource and more at Paul’s site, Skippyscage.

Paul Filmer

Credit

Intro music courtesy Brother Love from his Album Of The Year CD. Outtro by Bruno Misonne from The Sound of Flaps.

 

AirplaneGeeks 395 Trish Beckman Loves to Fly Fast

 

Trish Beckman in the F/A-18

We talk with the first American woman to qualify as a crewmember in both the F/A-18 and the F-15E, now working for Boeing. We also discuss airline and airport implications of a terrorist attack, record US airline traffic, the Coast Guard centennial, and F-35B deployment to Japan.

Guest

Patricia L. “Trish” Beckman is a Navy Officer, a Flight Navigator, an Aircraft Dispatcher and an Aeronautical Engineer. Trish is one of the women described in the book Trailblazers: The Women of the Boeing Company that we talked about with author Betsy Case in Episode 382.

Trish tells us about testing military and commercial aircraft prior to delivery, the history of women in military aviation, and the role she and others played that led to the repeal of the combat exclusion laws. With an extensive aviation background, Trish doesn’t disappoint as she tells us stories from her career, including a Kuwait F-18 experience that highlights different cultural views of women, specifically pilots, and how she and others responded. (Shhh, don’t tell anyone…)

Trish enlisted in the US Navy at age 18 and over the course of 28 years she learned to operate and maintain flight simulators, completed flight training as a Naval Flight Officer, graduating from US Naval Test Pilot School, earned a Bachelor’s degree in Aerospace Engineering and a Master’s degree in Aeronautical Engineering.  

As a Naval Flight Officer, Trish flew in 67 types of military aircraft, with primary qualifications in the EC-130Q, F/A-18D, E-6A, S-3A/B, and F-15E.  She was the first American woman to qualify as a crewmember in the F/A-18 (F/A-18D, 1990, Weapon Systems Officer) and the first woman to qualify as a crewmember in the F-15 (F-15E, 1992, Weapons Systems Officer).

F/A-18 by David Vanderhoof

F/A-18 by David Vanderhoof

In 1991, Trish and other women military aviators helped educate the US Senate on career restrictions caused by the 1948 “Aviation Combat Exclusion” laws, which directly led to the repeal of those laws. Since 1993 when President Clinton changed the policy regarding assignment of women to combat missions, women now fly all military aircraft in almost every military mission.

Since June 2013, Trish supports military aircraft flight test at Boeing Test & Evaluation at Edwards Air Force Base and China Lake, both in California.  For the previous 12 years, she flew as a Systems Operator (similar to flight engineer) for production and engineering test flights of the Boeing 737, and as a Flight Test Navigator for ferry flights and engineering test flights for most Boeing aircraft (737, 747, 757, 767, 777, 787).  She has logged over 6000 flight hours in 73 aircraft types.

Trish is a founding board member of Women in Aviation International (WAI) and a past president of Women Military Aviators, Inc. (WMA).  She also mentors and supports women aviators worldwide, through such organizations as Canadian Women in Aviation (CWIA), Aviation and Women in Europe (AWE), the Russian Club of Women Aviators (Aviatrissa), Southern African Women in Aviation (SAWIA), and Women Aviators in Africa (WAFRIC).

Trish works to inspire and motivate young people to pursue careers in math, science, and aviation.  She is a mentor for the Raisbeck Aviation High School in Seattle, a workshop presenter for Sally Ride Science Festivals around the country, and a mentor for several aerospace museums nationwide which encourage young people to navigate a path to success in the world of aviation.

News

Crisis communications lessons from Brussels attacks – what can airlines learn?

SimpliFlying Senior Consultant Marco Serusi takes a look at the Brussels Airport attack on March 21, 2016 and thinks the way the Airport and Brussels Airlines handed the crisis is a good model for other airlines and airports. He also provides some lessons for the next crisis.

The Israeli model: What airport safety looks like, and what it costs travelers

Israel’s Ben Gurion Airport may be the world’s safest airport. It features the use of five layers of security that starts just after you leave the highway, as well as racial profiling techniques.

Pinni Schiff, a former security chief for Israel’s Airport Authority, said “You can’t have 100 percent protection of privacy and human rights and not have terror attacks. You can’t have both. It doesn’t go together. Europe has to improve on this.”

US airline traffic sets all-time record in 2015

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) released the 2015 U.S.-Based Airline Traffic Data report. The BTS says. “U.S. airlines and foreign airlines serving the United States carried an all-time high of 895.5 million systemwide (domestic and international) scheduled service passengers in 2015, 5.0 percent more than the previous record high of 853.1 million reached in 2014.”

American Airlines carried more total system passengers in 2015 than any other U.S. airline. British Airways carried the most passengers on international flights to and from the U.S. of any foreign airline. Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International had the most total system passengers board planes in 2015, and more passengers boarded international flights at New York John F. Kennedy.

Coast Guard Welcomes Yellow-Painted Throwback Rescue Helicopter to Northeast Skies

Coast Guard Air Station Cape Cod received a MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter with the historic chrome yellow paint scheme used by Coast Guard and Navy helicopters in the late 1940s and early 1950s. In celebration of the Coast Guard’s 100th aviation anniversary on April 1, 2016, sixteen aircraft in total are getting historic paint jobs to represent different eras of Coast Guard aviation, including Jayhawk and Dolphin helicopters and the HC-144 Ocean Sentry airplane.

10 F-35Bs to be deployed to Japan in January 2017

The U.S. Marine Corps plans to deploy the F-35B to MCAS Iwakuni in January 2017, replacing the F/A-18.

The Airplane of the Week

F-15 by David Vanderhoof

F-15 by David Vanderhoof

In honour of our guest, David looks at the F-15E. The Strike Eagle grew out the aircraft that was designed from the outset as “not a pound for air to ground.” The Strike Eagle is now flown by the US and its allies in the Middle East and Southeast Asia.

Listener Recording

Launchpad Marzari comments on the Spartan Executive and wonders why the cost of a comparable new aircraft has doubled, if not tripled, taking inflation into account.

Mentioned

India all set to become the world’s third largest aviation market by 2020, says new study

India is predicted to become the world’s third largest commercial aviation market by 2020, after the US and China.

Airshow Schedules

Photo

Piper tri-Pacer model

The Piper tri-Pacer model built by Jeff’s father and grandfather, now “flying” in his daughter’s room.

Credit

Opening music courtesy Brother Love from his Album Of The Year CD. Outtro by Bruno Misonne from The Sound of Flaps.

 

Episode 233 – USAF Test Pilots School

Major Brandon “Cain’n” Abel

We talk with Major Brandon “Cain’n” Abel, and Major John “Manson” Appelt, Experimental Test Instructor Pilots from the USAF Test Pilot School. Greg Morris from Gauntlet Warbirds joins in.

The USAF Test Pilot School is a 48 week program for classes of 20-24 students. Graduates go on to test and evaluate weapons systems as test pilots or test engineers. We talk with Cain’n and Manson about the selection process for admission into the School, the variety of aircraft flown at the School, and what a flight test mission involves.

The week’s aviation news:

David gives us a debrief on the Airpigz.com meetup at the Smithsonian’s National Air & Space Museum in Washington, D.C. and at the Udvar-Hazy Center next to Dulles.

F-22 by David Vanderhoof

In this week’s Australia Desk report:

Qantas experiences teething problems with its new alliance partner as their booking system allocates premium economy seats on Emirates aircraft – a class not available with that carrier.

Tiger Airways profits slip as they await a ruling by the Australian Competition & Consumer Commission on their proposed takeover by Virgin Australia.

Jetstar Japan takes delivery of two new A320s.

The first former RAAF C-130H to be gifted to Indonesia (formerly A97-006) takes to the skies following deep maintenance in preparation for the transfer.

The USAF confirm they are sending two F-22 Raptors to this year’s Australian International Air Show (Avalon), and unlike their last visit in 2011, this time they’ll be putting on an aerial display.

Grant is heading to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia this week as a guest of Malaysia Airlines to cover their launch into the One World Alliance.

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124. Australia Desk archives can be found at www.australiadesk.net.

Fairey Barracuda

In this week’s Across the Pond segment:

Naval Air Historian Matt Willis joins us to discuss his new book on the Fairey Barracuda a mono wing fleet air arm torpedo bomber from the second world war. Designed to be a mulit functional aircraft, the ‘Barra’ suffered reputational challenges from its perceived weaknesses. However, it proved itself many times and flew well into the ‘50’s.

Not a single complete airframe is left of the 2,600 Barracuda’s built but there is a project being delivered by the Bluebird team and supported by the Fleet Air Arm Museum at Yeovilton to recreate a lasting memory to this both beloved and sometimes sneered upon aircraft. To Pieter, it is of course the chariot on which his father flew the majority of his fleet air arm missions and activities and therefore remembered with a little more fondness than others.

Matt can be found at www.navalairhistory.com and on Twitter @NavalAirHistory.

Matt’s published books include: Blackburn Skua and Roc and Junkers Ju 87 Stuka.

Naval History Links:

In Memorium:

Mentions:

USAF Test Pilots School

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

Episode 111 – Airline Revenue Management

F-15 by Paul Filmer

Guest Jesse Ziglar works for a large airline in revenue management. He was previously with DHL Express, and he interned with Delta Air Lines in schedule planning. Jesse got his private pilot license at Peter O. Knight Airport in Tampa, but went on to earn an under graduate degree in Aviation Management (With Flight) and his flight training ending with commercial, multi-engine, and instrument licenses. Jesse blogs at Airtransparency and has a few things to say about the need for more creativity in the airlines.

The week’s aviation news:

Mentions:

Follow the @AirplaneGeeks on Twitter and on Facebook, send us email at thegeeks@airplanegeeks.com, or leave a message on our listener line: (361) GEEKS01.

Opening and closing music is provided by Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at http://www.brotherloverocks.com/.

F-15 photo by Paul Filmer. Find his aviation photography at http://skippyscage.com/.

Episode 93 – Rottler Returns

Guest Martin Rottler makes a return appearance. Martin is an airline junkie, a licensed commercial pilot for single and multi-engine aircraft with an Instrument Rating, and a CFI. He’s also a graduate student at the University of North Dakota. This summer Martin will be participating in a project to bring aviation to tribal school students in North Dakota. Download the program overview here.  Find Martin’s blog at http://martinrottler.com/.

The news:

We also have the This Week in Aviation history segment from David, and the Airplane Geeks Australia Desk report.

Follow the @AirplaneGeeks on Twitter, send us email at thegeeks@airplanegeeks.com, or leave a message on our listener line: (361) GEEKS01.

F-15 Strike Eagle courtesy Photography by Hank Plumley.

Opening and closing music is provided by Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. Visit his site at http://www.brotherloverocks.com/.

Episode 43 – Richard Aboulafia – “Funniest Man in Aviation”

f-22

During Episode 41, Jon Ostrower named Richard Aboulafia as the “funniest man in aviation.”  So we decided to put that to the test once more as we welcome Richard back from his blog at RichardAboulafia.com.

Jon was right.

Max’s pick of the week is Manchester Airport’s Guide to Traveling with Autism.

The Airplane Geeks are now on Twitter! You can follow us @AirplaneGeeks.

Make sure to sign up for our new newsletter, “Airplane Geeks Week in Aviation.”
We’ll be bringing you these show notes, as well as some of the week’s news we didn’t have time to cover.
You can sign up at AirplaneGeeks.com.

Brother Love is responsible for this episode’s opening and closing
music, and you can visit his site at brotherloverocks.com.

If you have a question or a comment for the Airplane Geeks, you
can send it to thegeeks@airplanegeeks.com.

You can also leave us voice mail at (812) 757-4252. If you have
a question or comment you’d like mentioned on the podcast, this is the best
way to go about it.