Tag Archives: Garmin

436 Flying Magazine’s Stephen Pope

We talk with Stephen Pope, the Editor-in-Chief of Flying magazine. In the news, we look at a United Airlines computer problem, tracking passengers moving through the airport, the search for MH 370 concludes, ADS-B capable satellites, the latest Mitsubishi MRJ delay, B-2 bombers fly a 30-hour mission, testing tiltrotors, a possible lead in the 1971 hijacking by D.B. Cooper, and a tribute to Gene Cernan.

Guest

Flying magazine's Editor in Chief Stephen Pope

Stephen Pope, Editor in Chief, Flying magazine

Stephen Pope is Editor-in-Chief of Flying magazine. We talk about Light Sport Aircraft, third class medical reform, and flying with the Garmin G1000 NXi. Steve also explains how Flying is changing its look, content, website, and e-news product to compete with digital aviation news outlets. We also get some good suggestions for those who might consider aviation journalism as a career choice, either full-time or freelance.

Steve is an award-winning aviation journalist and commercial pilot with multi-engine, instrument, and seaplane ratings. He has been writing for aviation magazines for more than 20 years on a wide range of flying topics.

Steve learned to fly at age 15 in a Piper Cub at Trinca Airport, a small grass strip in northern New Jersey. He worked as a line boy at the 60th Street Heliport in New York City and for First Aviation at Teterboro Airport. After soloing at 16, earning his private pilot’s license at 17, and gaining his instrument rating a year later, Steve enrolled at the University of Maryland as a journalism major, where he received his degree and completed an editorial internship with AOPA Pilot magazine.

After graduating, Stephen joined the editorial staff of Aviation International News, a business aviation trade magazine. During his 15 years with AIN he moved up the ranks to become Senior Editor directing avionics and technology coverage, Editor-in-Chief of Convention Publications and, in his last role with the company, Editor-in-Chief of Business Jet Traveler magazine. He joined the staff of Flying in 2010.

Steve has won seven Aerospace Journalist of the Year awards, including being named overall Aerospace Journalist of the Year in 2007. He has also won three NBAA Gold Wing Journalism Awards and has written for Barron’s, The Wall Street Journal, and many other publications.

Aviation News

United Airlines resumes flights after temporary ground order

A computer problem with Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS) temporarily grounded all domestic United Airlines mainline flights.

Cool or Creepy? Houston Airports now Tracking Phone Signals to Provide Checkpoint Data

Houston airports are now monitoring Bluetooth signals from travelers’ phones. This lets the airport track checkpoint wait times in real-time. In a news release, Houston airport spokesperson Bill Begley said, “The tracking is anonymous and uses a variety of filters to ensure both anonymity and accuracy, and then uses that data to provide an average time for travelers passing through the checkpoints.”

Search Ends For Malaysian Flight 370

In an MH370 Joint Communique, the Australian Government announced that the search for MH370 has been suspended. “The decision to suspend the underwater search has not been taken lightly nor without sadness,” the joint statement read. “We remain hopeful that new information will come to light and that at some point in the future the aircraft will be located.”

Aireon Launch Begins New Era for Satellite-Based Aircraft Surveillance

The recent successful SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launch put the first 10 Iridium Next satellites into low-Earth orbit. Each satellite carries an ADS-B receiver to be part of Aireon’s global ADS-B-based aircraft-tracking system, operational by the second quarter of 2018.

Mitsubishi delays MRJ deliveries by two years

In its January 23 press release, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries announced “that MHI and Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation will adjust the first delivery of the Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ) from mid-2018 to mid-2020. The change is due to revisions of certain systems and electrical configurations on the aircraft to meet the latest requirements for certification.” See MRJ’s Latest Development Status and the Advancing the MRJ project PDF.

All we know about the U.S. B-2 bombers 30-hour round trip mission to pound Daesh in Libya

Two U.S. Air Force B-2 Spirit bombers flew a long-duration mission from the 509th Bomb Wing at Whiteman Air Force Base.

Unique Tiltrotor Test Rig To Begin Operational Runs At NASA Ames

NASA’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, California is preparing for the first functional trial of a new Tiltrotor Test Rig.

New Lead on D.B. Cooper — May have Worked for Boeing!

New clues may point to the identity of the 1971 hijacker who disappeared with the ransom money, never to be found.

The Aviation Minute

Rob Mark takes a look at the Aireon launch and aircraft tracking.

Contributor Recording

Our Main(e) Man Micah brings us God Bless You Gene Cernan.

Credit

Intro music courtesy Brother Love from his Album Of The Year CD. Outtro by Bruno Misonne from The Sound of Flaps.

AirplaneGeeks 269 – Upset Prevention and Recovery Training

Randy Brooks

Guest Randy Brooks is an active Upset Prevention and Recovery Training (UPRT) instructor and also manages flight training operations at the Aviation Performance Solutions (APS) Texas location.

We talk about how Upset Prevention and Recovery Training grew from the awareness that loss of control in flight was the biggest threat in aviation, and the formation of the International Committee for Aviation Training in Extended Envelopes.

Part of the problem of loss of control in flight is handled through better simulators, but with training in actual aircraft, pilots are presented with a higher perception of risk. In this environment, human learning actually shifts to a different part of the brain – the part used in actual flight emergencies.

UPRT is related to aerobatics. Think of acrobatics as precision maneuvering with a known outcome. UPRT, on the other hand, can be characterized as non-precision maneuvering to correct an unknown condition.

Randy holds an Airline Transport Pilot rating with over 12,500 hours of flight time in over 100 different aircraft. He was a professional airshow pilot, Director of Operations for the Red Baron Squadron, a formation aerobatic team with seven Stearmans. At Eclipse, he was Manager of Emergency Situation Training and Director of Customer Training and piloted the single-engined Eclipse Concept Jet prototype at Oshkosh in 2007.

Follow Aviation Performance Solutions on Twitter and Facebook.

See also:

The Week’s Aviation News:

 

Tom's Cozy

Tom’s Cozy

David Vanderhoof’s Aircraft of the Week:

This week listener Tom Brusehaver provides the history of the Cozy Mk 4.

In this week’s Australia Desk:

Grant’s getting all nautical thanks to his recent interviews in Sydney for the International Fleet Review but Steve’s choice of music may give the wrong impression (or was that in the bloopers?).

The dynamic roo-eaters then go on to discuss a recent coroner’s report that gives a damning indictment of CASA following a joy flight accident.

In this week’s Across the Pond segment:

This week we are joined by Tony Bishop from e-Go aeroplanes who have designed and are manufacturing a sleek new innovative general aviation aircraft. More e-Go on Facebook, the Yahoo Group, flickr, and Vimeo.

Mentioned:

and these on Ballistic Recovery parachutes: