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508 Innovations In Flight 2018

Innovations in Flight Family Day and Outdoor Aviation Display

Innovations in Flight Family Day and Outdoor Aviation Display

Innovations in Flight Family Day and Outdoor Aviation Display

June 16, 2018

This is an annual event by the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. Innovations in Flight is sponsored by United Airlines.

Airplane Geeks again participated in the event and we recorded interviews at our display inside the museum. Here they are, with start times:

Interviews

[09:25] Adam Klein, a research pilot for NASA at Johnson Space Center trains astronauts and flies the NT-38 NASA test aircraft. After studying permafrost in Alaska, Adam had the opportunity to fly through the eclipse on the way back to California.

NT-38 NASA test aircraft

NT-38 NASA test aircraft

[26:17] Katharine volunteers with the Society of Women Engineers. She tells us about the organization, how it is reaching young women, and how the messaging has changed to be current with the times.

[34:10] J.B. Hollyer pilots the Grumman HU-16C Albatross “Pegasus.” He’s president of Seaplane Crossings.org a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that teaches the history of seaplane aviation and is working to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of the first airplane crossing of the Atlantic, achieved in May 1919 by NC-4. Also see the Flying Boat website, a documentary film about human aspiration told through the history, romance, and adventure of flying boats.

Grumman HU-16C Albatross “Pegasus”

Grumman HU-16C Albatross “Pegasus”

[46:00] Young Jack is a seasoned air traveler who was attending the event.

[50:28] Capt. Andy Schwartzman flies the A320 for United and tells us about his career path and flying side stick and yoke.

[65:21] Cadet 2nd Lieutenant Corey and Cadet Tech Sergeant Smith describes the Civil Air Patrol and the Cadet program which develops leadership skills and provides character enrichment. We talk about the classes and activities, the ranks and the progression.

[1:07:07] Brian has an Airline Story of the Week based on his United flight into Dulles.

[1:12:15] Listener Tanya Weiman flew from New York for the day and talks to us about aviation podcasts and the community they create.

[1:18:02] Eric Galler is producer/director of the Science of Flight from The Great Courses. This features 24 lectures by Smithsonian curators in a four DVD set. It was produced in cooperation with The Great Courses and the Smithsonian.

[1:27:36] Captain Rick Bell tells us about transitioning from the C-130 to the C-17, and how the C-17 is different to fly.

[1:36:24] A380 pilot Bjorn tells us what it is like to fly the A380 compared to other Airbus airplanes. Also, flying GA in Europe, the outlook for the A380, and an opinion on future unmanned airliners.

[1:45:03] Dispatcher Mike flew his 1963 Beechcraft Musketeer in from Atlanta with Capt. Jeff for the event. Mike describes the job of a dispatcher, if that makes you a better pilot, and if being a pilot make you a better dispatcher.

[2:02:33] Listener Andrew just starting his career in aviation and is moving to Wichita for his new job. We talk about what Airplane Geeks is all about and what it means.

[2:12:37] Capt. Jeff Nielsen from the Airline Pilot Guy Show talks about his military flying career and being an instructor pilot in the T-37 jet trainer. He also has some thoughts on piloting commercial aircraft.

[2:29:56] Wrap-up

[2:28:05] Post-event dinner

Credit

All photos by David Vanderhoof. Outtro by Bruno Misonne from The Sound of Flaps.

489 Airport Planner

We talk with an airport planner who also co-founded an organization for innovation in aviation. In the news, we discuss a very old paper travel voucher and how the airline reacted when it surfaced, a study of bacteria and fungus in the terminal and on aircraft, expensive refrigerators for Air Force One, and a donation by nine airlines to the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum. We also look at BA and their latest change to the passenger experience in short-haul flights, the Qantas challenge to Airbus and Boeing, and a conversation with the Chief of the Air Traffic Control Division at Robert Gray Army Airfield about ATIS.

Guest

Chris Groh, airport planner, co-founder of Runway.VC

Chris Groh

Chris Groh is an airport planner who works with airports of all sizes across the country, but his specialty is general aviation airports and even more specifically, smaller general aviation airports. As an airport planner, Chris acts as an extension of the airport’s staff, and he helps them think about the future while they focus on the day-to-day operations.

Chris says that GA airports are always fun because the staff is usually smaller, but so are the budgets so projects have to be carefully prioritized and typically require more creative solutions.

Chris co-founded an organization for innovation in aviation called Runway.VC. It attempts to broaden and freely distribute the conversations about aviation technology to a wide audience. It also seeks to facilitate networking and real-time interaction between professionals who are interested in the future of aviation but may not have access to conferences and other channels of discussions about innovation in aviation.  Besides online activities, Runway.VC has plans for local meetups across the country. Chris also hosts his own podcast about the future of aviation.

Visit the Runway.VC and Kutchins & Groh websites, listen to the Runway.VC podcast, and follow @runwayvc and @chrisgroh on Twitter.

Aviation News

A United Airlines Passenger Found a ‘Forever’ Travel Voucher From 1998. Here’s How United Responded

John Walker booked a United Airlines flight from Nashville to Sacramento 20 years ago, but wasn’t able to go. Recently, he discovered the $378 printed ticket voucher, dated December 31, 1998. He read the fine print, which said the ticket could, “forever be applied toward the purchase of another domestic non-refundable ticket, for the customer named on the ticket.”

Germs in airplane cabins are bad, but it’s even worse at the airport terminal

In their “Germs at the Airport” report, Insurancequotes.com says they “conducted 18 tests across six surfaces from three major U.S. airports and airline flights. We sent our swabs to the lab and found the average number of viable bacteria and fungal cells per square inch, or colony-forming units (CFU), to see how clean traveling really is.”

Air Force One’s new refrigerators will cost taxpayers $24 million

The U.S. Air Force has awarded Boeing a contract for $23,657,671 to replace two of the 1990 vintage chiller units on Air Force One. The Air Force says additional cold food storage is needed “to support onboard personnel for an extended period of time, without having to restock while abroad.”

Nine airlines donate $28 million to Air and Space Museum for makeover

Nine commercial airlines have joined to donate $28 million to the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum to support the renovation of the “America by Air” exhibition.

Across the Pond

With all the talk about ultra long-haul flights and Brian’s “short trip across to the UK,” Pieter looks at BA and their latest change to the passenger experience in short haul flights. Pieter then reflects on the Qantas challenge to Airbus and Boeing on the “Kangaroo Route.”

Brabazon Named Lecture 2017 – Turnaround, Technology and the Future of Travel Alan JoyceRoyal Aeronautical Society Lecture – Audio Download:

Airlines probed over ‘confusing’ seating policy

Qantas Boeing 787-9.

Qantas Boeing 787-9. Qantas photo.

Mentioned

PaxEx Podcast #54: Catering giant serves up wisdom on compliance with Mark Naylor, Head of Compliance for Gate Gourmet in Oceania. Gate Gourmet is the world’s largest provider of airline catering and onboard products and services.

Snowies and their admirers causing problems at Portland Jetport

Silencing a sonic boom would help a Concorde replacement

Credit

Intro music courtesy Brother Love from his Album Of The Year CD. Outtro by Bruno Misonne from The Sound of Flaps.

444 AOPA President Mark Baker

Guest Mark Baker is the President and CEO of AOPA, the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. In the news, wake turbulence from an A380 flips a Challenger 604, two flight attendants sue American Airlines for failure to enforce company policy, an engine on a Saab 340 loses its propeller in flight. Also, an interview from the National Air & Space Museum Restoration Hangar, and an idea for a circular runway.

Guest

Mark Baker, president and CEO, AOPA

Mark Baker, president and CEO, AOPA.

Mark Baker is President and CEO of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. He is also chairman of AOPA’s Political Action Committee, chief executive officer for the AOPA Foundation, president of the International Council of Aircraft Owners and Pilots Associations representing pilots in 72 countries, and publisher of AOPA Pilot, the world’s largest aviation publication.

We talk about air traffic control privatization, user fees, BasicMed, and other areas of aviation advocacy by AOPA. Mark tells us about the effectiveness of AOPA regional fly-ins, and touches on aviation safety and Congressional general aviation caucuses.

Mark is a longtime general aviation pilot and has been flying for 35 years with over 7,500 hours. He holds certificates for commercial pilot with single- and multi-engine land and seaplane ratings, rotorcraft rating, and type ratings in the Cessna Citation 500 and 525s

Aviation News

The Wait for ATC Privatization is Over as White House Budget Emerges

President Trump’s proposed 2018 budget would privatize air traffic control operations by creating an “independent, non-governmental organization.” Who would control the new corporate entity, and how it will be funded?

Enroute A380 wake flips Challenger 604 upside down

An Emirates Airbus A380-800 was at FL350 over the Arabian Sea when a Challenger 604 business jet passed 1000 feet underneath in opposite direction. The A380 continued to Sydney uneventfully. The Challenger didn’t fare so well in the wake turbulence from the A380.

American Airlines flight attendants sue, say they’ve been called sows, prostitutes and worse on Facebook

Two flight attendants claiming sexual and gender harassment on social media have filed federal lawsuits against American Airlines for failed to enforce its policies governing employee use of social media.

Field Interview

David speaks with Christopher Moore at the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar about the preservation of the Martin B-26B-25-MA Marauder “Flak-Bait”. This medium bomber flew over 200 missions during World War II, the most for any American aircraft.

Christopher Moore (L) and David Vanderhoof at the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar

Christopher Moore (L) and David Vanderhoof at the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar.

Listener Recording

Glen Towler tells us about two of his his most memorable flights.

Mentioned

AOPA Live This Week – The weekly news video podcast from AOPA.

The Boeing Company 2016 Annual Report [PDF] See page 125 if you are interested in picking up the last new C-17 Globemaster III. Credit to Launchpad Marzari for the sharp eye.

Passenger plane’s propeller shears off in mid-flight, forcing emergency landing at Sydney

Will circular runways ever take off? from the BBC. See also the Endless Runway project page.

Credit

Intro music courtesy Brother Love from his Album Of The Year CD. Outtro by Bruno Misonne from The Sound of Flaps.

 

409 Vet Air: Flying Veterans in Need of Medical Care

Providing veterans with air transportation to and from healthcare facilities, an around-the-world record attempt, Air Force to use enlisted airmen as RPA pilots, FAA encourages GA aircraft owners to voluntarily install safety equipment, a cable break during a carrier landing, and growing military aircraft in chemical vats. Plus, a report on the new Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum.

Guest

Karen and Jesus Pereira

Karen and Vet Air’s Jesus Pereira

Jesus Pereira founded Vet Air in 2015 as a non-profit 501(c)(3) charity that uses volunteer pilots and GA airplanes to provide veterans with air transportation to and from healthcare facilities, as well as flights for compassionate reasons.

Having joined the Massachusetts Army National Guard in February 1996, Jesus attended basic training at Fort Jackson South Carolina, and received his Advanced Individual Training at Fort Lee Virginia as a Petroleum Supply Specialist. He is currently serving with HHC 126th BSB with the grade of E-7, Sergeant First Class. He has one deployment to Kuwait in 2010 where he served with the Army Aviation Task Force.

Jesus with therapy dogs Gizmo and Bella

Jesus with therapy dogs Gizmo and Bella

Jesus is currently a Veteran Service Officer for the Town of Longmeadow in Massachusetts. His primary function is to provide Veterans with MGL Chapter 115 benefits and assistance with federal VA benefits. Jesus holds a private pilot certificate with complex, high performance, and tailwheel endorsements.

Learn more at VetAir.org, and on the VetAir Facebook page.

News

Teen pilot Lachlan Smart on track for world record

Eighteen year old Lachlan Smart wants to become the youngest person to fly solo around the world in a single-engine aircraft, and he plans to make 24 stops in his Cirrus SR22 doing it. Follow his journey at Wings Around the World.

Air Force plans 100 enlisted drone pilots by 2020

The Air Force expects to graduate the first class of enlisted airmen in 2017 for remotely piloted aircraft, specifically unarmed RQ-4 Global Hawks used for high-altitude reconnaissance missions. The graduates would become the first Air Force enlisted pilots since World War II.

FAA Policy Helps Modernize GA Airplanes and Helicopters

FAA Policy No: PS-AIR-21.8-1602 [PDF] “encourages general aviation aircraft owners to voluntarily install safety equipment on airplanes and helicopters that is not required by the agency’s regulations.”

Navy: Human error to blame for March cable break aboard USS Eisenhower flight deck

An arresting cable broke when an E2-C Hawkeye attempted to make a carrier landing, injuring eight sailors. The video shows the dramatic recovery by the pilot of the Hawkeye.

Cable snaps on USS Eisenhower during landing

BAE Systems wants to grow military aircraft in chemical vats

BAE Systems and the University of Glasgow are working on a manufacturing method that utilizes a “Chemputer” at the molecular level to assemble objects. Originally developed for pharmaceuticals, this might allow the construction of small UAVs or components for large manned aircraft.

Growing UAVs Through Chemistry

Resources:

Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall

Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall

Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall

David attended the opening of the new Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum. We hear opening remarks from Dr. Bob van der Linden, Chairman of the Aeronautics Department, and Dr. Margaret Weitekamp, a curator in the Space History Department.

We then hear David’s interview with Bob van der Linden, who describes some of the changes made, the visitor experience, and the special photo op with the Spirit of St. Louis and the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM).

NASM app logoNext, David talks with Vicki Portway and Sarah Banks from the social media team about how the museum is reaching out and transforming itself through the “experience loop.” We also hear about the new GO FLIGHT: National Air and Space Museum app for iOS and Android. The app lets you connect to the museum from wherever you are.

Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall

Mentioned

Routehappy job page.

Credit

Intro music courtesy Brother Love from his Album Of The Year CD. Outtro by Bruno Misonne from The Sound of Flaps

406 Innovations in Flight 2016

The Airplane Geeks attended the Innovations in Flight Family Day and Outdoor Aviation Display on Saturday, June 18, 2016 at the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia.

Airplane Geeks Innovations in Flight 2016

The Airplane Geeks: Micah, Brian, Max, Benet, David

Interviews

Commander Brian McGlaughin, USCG

Commander Brian McGlaughin

Commander Brian McGlaughin

The United States Coast Guard is celebrating 100 years of aviation in 2016, and we hear about the mission of Coast Guard, flying in Alaska, the Sikorsky HH-52 Seaguard that was inducted into the National Air & Space Museum, the new C-130J, and of course, the 100th celebration activities.

Steve Lott, The Boeing Company

Steve Lott

Steve Lott

Steve is the Director of Communications for Boeing, based in Washington D.C. He talks about Boeing’s 100th year anniversary and explains that July 15, 2016 is Founders Day, when Bill Boeing had his first flight. Boeing employs a number of full time historians, and maintains a very large historical archive, including many photographs.

Steve tells us about the Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall renovation at the NASM downtown on the Mall, and reminds us about the excellent The Age of Aerospace series. This documentary explores the last 100 years of aviation history and is presented by Boeing and Discovery Communications.

Captain Caitlin Diffley, USAF

Captain Caitlin Diffley

Captain Caitlin Diffley

Captain Diffley is the Regional Director for the United States Air Force Academy Admissions Office for the Northeast. She describes opportunities at the Academy and the many concentrations offered. Learn more about the application process at AcademyAdmissions.com.

Max Flight

During a brief lull in the interviews, David and Benet decide to “interview” Max and hear about his visit outside the Museum to see the aircraft and automobiles on display. Max also describes his experience at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Pennsylvania.

Steve Maloney

Steve Maloney

Steve Maloney

Steve is a contemporary artist from California who transformed a boneyard U.S. Army Huey helicopter into a mixed-media sculpture. The helicopter served as an air ambulance during the Vietnam War, and Take Me Home Huey is now touring the U.S. to honor Vietnam vets and facilitate conversation about their service.

Watch the trailer of the documentary film about the role Hueys played during conflicts as told by pilots, mechanics and helicopter crew members.

Bill Barry, NASA

NASA Chief Historian Bill Barry (seated, far left) and some airplane geeks

NASA Chief Historian Bill Barry (seated, far left) and some airplane geeks

NASA Chief Historian Bill Barry tells us about some of the other anniversaries in 2016, including the first Viking lander on Mars 40 years ago, the 10th anniversary of the first COTS (commercial off the shelf technology) contact for launch services delivering material to the Space Station, the 100th anniversary of Langley, and even the 50th anniversary of Star Trek. Bill talks about naming the Space Shuttle Enterprise rather than Constitution, the aeronautics programs at NASA, and public interest in NASA activities. Be sure to visit the NASA History webpage.

Photos

Take Me Home Huey

Take Me Home Huey

DSCF9051_600

Micah and Brian

Micah and Brian

Credit

Airplane Geeks would like to thank the National Air & Space Museum for inviting us back to the Innovations in Flight event. This is a must-attend, bring your family event held the Saturday before Father’s Day in June.

Photo credits: @ProfVanderhoof, @dronemama, @maxflight

Intro music courtesy Brother Love from his Album Of The Year CD. Outtro by Bruno Misonne from The Sound of Flaps.

AirplaneGeeks 396 The Emirates Employment Model

Emirates A380 by Paul Flimer

Conversation with the recruitment manager for Emirates about opportunities at the airline. Also, possible layoffs (or retirements) at Boeing, Air France service returning to Iran, new student pilot rules from the FAA, a buyer for Virgin America, and dogs – can they really fly?

Guest

Andrew Longley is Head of Recruitment – Flight Operations (Pilots) at Emirates. The airline operates to over 140 destinations with an all-widebody fleet of Boeing and Airbus aircraft. Emirates is the world’s largest operator of 777 and A380 aircraft.

Andrew Longley

Andrew Longley

Andy describes how the Emirates employment model is different than that of many other airlines. We take a look at the need to attract pilots and cabin crew from an international pool of candidates with strong leadership potential and good CRM skills. We also talk about pilot certification requirements, the Dubai lifestyle and airline accommodation of employee families, salaries, housing, medical insurance, and other career opportunities at Emirates.

Andy started his career in 2006 in the Royal New Zealand Navy as a Military Psychologist where he was responsible for the selection and assessment of specialist trades including helicopter pilots, special forces, and Navy divers. He also served as a UN peacekeeper for a year where he worked and lived in Syria and Lebanon monitoring the peace between the various at-war countries.

After Andy’s military time commitment ended in 2013, he worked as a consultant in the telecommunications and business fields including a year working at IBM.

But Andy saw a unique opportunity with Emirates and he moved to Dubai as a senior psychologist.  He became involved in Emirates pilot assessment and was responsible for profiling and assessing pilot candidates. He moved into pilot recruitment and leads the effort to find enough safe and capable pilots to fly a quickly growing fleet of wide-body aircraft.

Learn more at the Emirates Group Careers webpage. Pilots can look for the closed LinkedIn group “Future Pilots of Emirates Airlines.” Andy will be presenting and exhibiting at the FAPA Job Fair April 26, 2016 and the OBAP Spring Career Fair April 27, 2016, both in Las Vegas.

News

How The U.S. Government Helped Kill 4,000 Jobs This Week At Boeing

Boeing says that at least 4,000 (or 5%) of it’s workforce needs to be cut, and maybe as much as 10% (or 8,000 jobs). CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes (BCA) Ray Conner points to pricing pressure from Airbus with their A320 family and its effect on the 737.

Loren Thompson describes some other factors where the U.S. government shares blame:

  • Illegal European launch aid subsidies.
  • The Ex-Im Bank cannot make new deals until the Senate acts to confirm a necessary quorum of board members.
  • Low tanker price will drain funds from Boeing that could have been used to compete with Airbus.

Forget About Airbus Pricing Pressure At Boeing; Bigger Danger Is 15,000 Early Retirements

Aerospace analyst Scott Hamilton of Leeham Co. says early retirements by factory-floor workers could be a bigger impact than layoffs on the 737 and 787 production ramp up starting next year. The IAM (International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers) told told Hamilton that between 7,000 and 9,000 workers are eligible for early retirement in November, and they expect 3-5,000 might actually retire. However, Dennis Muilenburg, the CEO of The Boeing Co.says that “booking rates have held up well.” Cost cutting is offensive rather than defensive.

Air France cabin crew defy airline chiefs order to wear headscarves in Iran

Air France is scheduled to resume service between Paris and Tehran on April 17. By law, Iranian women are required to cover their hair. Some female cabin crew members say they won’t fly to Iran if they are ordered by the airline to wear headscarves after they disembark. Reportedly, an Air France memo to staff said female employees would be required to “wear trousers during the flight with a loose fitting jacket and a scarf covering their hair on leave the plane.”

New Student Pilot Rules Take Effect Today

In the past, many student pilots have celebrated their 16th birthday with their solo flight on that day. Now the FAA says it cannot start processing the student pilot certificate application until all requirements are met, including age.

Jason Blair posted a good resource on his website: Step by Step Process for Issuance of Student Pilot Certificates Using Updated FAA Student Pilot Certificate Procedures.

Alaska Air clinches Virgin America deal for $2.6B

Alaska Air Group plans to Virgin America in a deal valued at about $2.6 billion. If it goes through, Alaska Airlines would become the fifth-largest U.S. airline, behind  American, Delta, United, and Southwest.

Abandoned Dog Learns To Fly A Plane, Becomes World’s Cutest Co-Pilot

Maybe. Maybe not.

Listener Recording

Our Main(e) man Micah tells us about his second visit to the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum’s Stephen Udvar-Hazy Center in June 2015 for the Innovations in Flight Family Day and Outdoor Aviation Display. Join us at the 2016 June 18 in Chantilly, Virginia, adjacent to Dulles International Airport. See also Scott Spangler’s visit report Udvar-Hazy: Surprises & Friends Restored on Jetwhine.com.

Mentioned

Top 10 Aviation Museums to Visit in the U.S.

US Chamber of Commerce’s 15th Annual Aviation Summit

Listener Photo

Ryan Hothersall's model Mil Mi-8 in Mongolian markings

Ryan Hothersall’s model Mil Mi-8 in Mongolian markings

Credit

Post photo courtesy Paul Filmer, Skippyscage Photography.

Intro music courtesy Brother Love from his Album Of The Year CD. Outtro by Bruno Misonne from The Sound of Flaps.

 

AirplaneGeeks 355 Innovations in Flight Family Day 2015

NASM Innovations in Flight Family Day and Outdoor Aviation Display

Interviews from the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum’s Innovations in Flight Family Day and Outdoor Aviation Display.

Micah, Brian, Max, and David

Airplane Geeks Micah, Brian, Max, and David set up recording gear in front of the Junkers Ju-52 3M trimotor, and spent the day interviewing interesting Avgeeks.

Interviews

Elizabeth Borja

Elizabeth Borja

Elizabeth is Reference Coordinator for the National Air & Space Museum Archives. She tells us about the huge quantity of historic data is available in the Archives, and how it is used.

Hungarian baseball team

Hungarian baseball team

Peter Duro

A baseball team from Hungary attended the Innovations in Flight event, and stopped by to visit the Airplane Geeks.

Roger Connor

Roger Connor is Curator for Vertical Flight at the National Air & Space Museum and he tells us about some of the exciting new exhibits that are coming. August 1, 2015, a CH56 in Viet Nam configuration will fly in to join the displays. This public event will include an Osprey and both will be available for walkthrough.

In the Fall, the Sikorsky X-2 prototype will arrive, and an HH-52 joins the Museum next April.

Hillel Glazer

Aerospace engineer and faithful listener Hillel Glazer stopped by with some of his children. Hillel attended the recent AOPA homecoming fly-in and tells us about that, as well as a recent flight in instrument conditions that was a “learning experience.” Son Jacob takes the mic as well.

Dave Klain Mitsubishi MU-2B-60

Dave Klain

Dave Klain and daughter Lauren flew his Mitsubishi MU-2B-60 twin turboprop in for the event. Dave listens to Airplane Geeks and also flies wounded warriors for Veteran’s Airlift Command.

Gen. J.R. “Jack” Dailey, USMC (Ret.)

Jack Dailey is the John and Adrienne Mars Director of the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum. He oversees the operation of both National Air and Space Museum locations — the Museum in Washington, DC and the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia.

Others

Additional interviews with Roger Connor on unmanned aircraft, and Princess Aliyah Pandolfi on the Kashmir World Foundation will appear in future episodes of The UAV Digest.

Dinner

Thanks to all our friends who joined us for dinner after the Innovations in Flight event: John Leech, Rick Engber, Hillel Glazer (and Jacob, Alexander, and Sarah), Stephanie Plummer, Miami Rick, Capt. Jeff, Fred Samson, Ken Coburn and Greg Garretson from GoEngineer, Peter and Mai, as well as our “roadies” Lisa Leard and Michelle Vanderhoof.

Fun for kids

 

Columbia at NASM

 

United 767 at NASM

Credits

Post photos by @DroneMama and @MaxFlight.
Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.

AirplaneGeeks 303 – Become a Pilot Day 2014

David, Rob, Max, and Benet

Recorded at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum during the 10th annual Become a Pilot Family Day and Aviation Display.

This annual event at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, located in Chantilly, Virginia offers not only the Museum’s amazing exhibits, but also about 50 vintage, recreational, and home-built aircraft flown in for one day only. This year, United brought in a Boeing 777 that was open for a tour.

Our visit this year was sponsored by Iridium Communications Inc.

National Transportation Safety Board training center tour

TWA 800

The day before the event at the NASM, the NTSB was kind enough to provide us special access to their training center in Ashburn, Virginia. This marvelous facility is used to train NTSB accident investigators, as well as investigators from other agencies and organizations.

We were given a briefing on the TWA Flight 800 accident investigation, and then toured the aircraft reconstruction, which is used for training with permission of the victim’s families. The depth of the investigation (which took over four years) is amazing and the examining the physical evidence first hand is an experience we will not forget.

None of us came away with any faith in the conspiracy theories that continue to swirl around the accident. All the analysis points to an internal explosion of the fuel vapor in the center tank.

General (ret) John R. “Jack” Dailey

A retired U.S. Marine Corps four-star general and pilot, he’s been the director of the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum since 2000. We talk with the General about his expectations for the event and stimulating STEM. Also, about the future of the Museum with more people visiting online. The NASM is digitizing their database and is planning for free online accessibility. The Museum also plans to bring in more of the aircraft they have.

Capt. Robert Randazzo

1941 ex-Pan American World Airways DC-3 (NC33611)

Robert Randazzo flew-in the 1945 ex-Pan American World Airways DC-3 (NC33611) he has restored in full Pan Am livery and named the “Tabatha May.” We also talk a bit about Randazzio’s past experience racing a T-6 at Reno.

Matt Desch

Iridium Go!

Matt Desch is the CEO of Iridium Communications, the world’s largest satellite system. Their new Iridium Go! product is the first satellite WiFi voice and data hotspot that works anywhere on the planet at any altitude. Interestingly, Iridium offers an API so developers can create apps for the device.

Matt is also on the Board of AOPA, and we talk about the organization’s mission, the value of being a member, current aviation issues, and the Rusty Pilots program. New AOPA President Mark Baker has initiated a series of regional fly-ins across the U.S., with very good results. On the topic of the cost to be a private pilot, we chat about renovating older airplanes as an affordable option.

Iridium was kind enough to sponsor the Airplane Geeks at the event.

Bill Barry

Bill Barry is Chief Historian with the NASA History Program Office, and we talk about what interests an historian at the NASM and the relationship between NASA and the NASM. The predecessor organization of NASA, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), will have been founded 100 ago next year, and we talk about the many significant contributions they made.

Follow the History Program Office on Twitter at @NASAHistory and visit them on Facebook.

Edgar “E.T.” Tello

Seabee

A current B757/767 Captain with United, Tello flew in the B777 on display. But he also owns a Republic Seabee and Rob talks with him about that aircraft. The Seabee was envisioned as a sport plane for pilots returning after the Second World War.

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

Become a Pilot Day 2014, NASM

We’d like to thank the staff and crew at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center for their hard work to make this event a success, and for facilitating the content we bring to you. We’d also like to thank the NTSB for giving us access to their training center, and for their strong dedication to making aviation safer for all of us.

Episode 253 – Become a Pilot Day 2013

Become a Pilot Day

Recorded at the Smithsonian’s National Air & Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center during the 9th annual Become a Pilot Family Day and Aviation Display.

Rob and BenetRob and Benet

Interviews:

Adam Smith, Senior Vice President, Center to Advance the Pilot Community, AOPA.

Joel Westbrook, Executive Producer, Air Fare America. This TV series being developed about GA is based on interesting places you can go, what you can do there, and the restuarants to visit. A hangar rat looks at the hangars behind the hangars, and what you can find there. It’s food, adventure, and pickers. @AirFareAmerica.
Colin an 11 year old airplane geek from Alexandria, Virginia.

David on the new F100 Super Sabre exhibit and some of the aircraft being restored at the Udvay-Hazy Restoration Center: SB-2C Helldiver, Sikorsky JRS-1 Flying Boat, a flying wing.

Bill Knight, Smithsonian Docent and avgeek since he was four years old.

Dave “Bio” Baranek, author of Top Gun Days. Available online, in bookstores, and as an eBook. See topgunbio.com. Bio flew the F-14A Tomcat with several fighter squadrons and was a Tomcat Instructor.

Ryan Ewing from Airlinegeeks.com.

Benet and Rob chat about their interest in aviation, flight attendants, bad mannered passengers, and the Enolla Gay.

John R. “Jack” Dailey, a retired U.S. Marine Corps four-star general and pilot. He’s Director of the National Air & Space Museum.

Marcy Heacker, Program Specialist, Smithsonian Natural History Museum, Feather Identification Lab. See wildlife.faa.gov.

William Edwards, University of Maryland Project Manager of the Gamera human powered helicopter project.

Ryan EwingRyan Ewing

Dave "Bio" BaranekDavid talks with Dave “Bio” Baranek

Smithsonian docent Bill KnightSmithsonian docent Bill Knight

Sikorsky Flying BoatSikorsky Flying Boat

Solar Impulse

The day after the event, the Solar Impulse arrived on it’s flight across the U.S.

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

Episode 245 – Time and Navigation at the Smithsonian

Time and Navigation

David Vanderhoof was invited to be a social media participant for the opening of the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum’s new exhibit, Time and Navigation: The untold story of getting from here to there. He brings us recordings and interviews from the event.

The full selection of audio recordings, (with play times):

How did the aviators "shoot" the sun and stars?

The Winnie Mae, the airplane Wiley Post flew in his record-breaking flights around the world in 1931 and 1933

Time and Navigation: The Untold Story of Getting from Here to There, Fact Sheet:

Opening April 12, 2013, National Mall building, Gallery 213

Presented in collaboration with the National Museum of American History

Sections: Navigating at Sea; Navigating in the Air; Navigating in Space; Inventing Satellite Navigation; and Navigation for Everyone.

Sponsored by: Northrop Grumman Corporation, Exelis Inc., Honeywell, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, U.S. Department of Transportation, Magellan, National Coordination Office for Space-Based Positioning, Navigation & Timing, Rockwell Collins and the Institute of Navigation.

“Time and Navigation” explores how revolutions in timekeeping over three centuries have influenced how people find their way. Through artifacts dating from centuries ago to today, the exhibition traces how timekeeping and navigational technologies evolved to help navigators find their way in different modes of travel, in different eras and different environments. Methods are traced through the decades to show that of all the issues facing navigation, one challenge stands out: The need to determine accurate time.

Twelve Things People Might Not Know about Time and Navigation

1. Although it was possible to navigate at sea before 1700, very precise positions could not be determined without accurate time and reliable clocks.

2. The earliest sea-going marine chronometer made in the United States was produced by Bostonian William Cranch Bond during the War of 1812.

3. Calculating position only by monitoring time, speed and direction is called Dead Reckoning. Measuring movement using only internal sensors is known as Inertial Navigation. Observing the sun, moon, or stars at precise times to determine position is known as Celestial Navigation. Radio Navigation systems use radio signals to maintain a course or fix a position.

4. The first several Soviet and American spacecraft sent to the moon missed it completely and crashed on the moon or were lost in space. Subsequent missions achieved their objectives as better techniques for guidance and navigation were developed.

5. When the first men went to the moon (Apollo 8), they used a sextant to help them navigate.

6. A spacecraft travelling across the solar system navigates by means of precisely timed radio signals sent back and forth to Earth. Navigators on Earth track its location and speed and transmit course adjustments. These techniques allow navigators to guide a probe to a planetary rendezvous or a pinpoint landing.

7. Space shuttles used onboard star trackers to locate their position in space with high accuracy. Once the shuttle reached orbit, the tracker automatically locked onto a star to orient the spacecraft.

8. The fundamental unit of time, the second, was defined in the past by the rotation of the Earth. Since 1967, the second has been defined by the signature frequency of a form of the element cesium.

9. A navigator on a ship at sea 100 years ago needed to know the time to the second. GPS satellite navigation works by measuring time to billionths of a second.

10. Albert Einstein’s understanding of space and time and relativity contributed to global navigation. Because GPS satellites experience lower gravity and move at high speeds, their clocks operate at a different rate than clocks on Earth. Since all the clocks in the system must be synchronized, a net correction of 38 millionths of a second per day must be added to the satellite clock’s time.

11. Increasingly reliable clocks and improved navigation methods have allowed navigators to calculate spacecraft positions with greater accuracy. By 2012 missions could be tracked with 100,000 times the accuracy possible in the early 1960s.

12. Atomic clocks in GPS satellites keep time to within three nanoseconds—three-billionths of a second.

The week’s aviation news:

In this week’s Australia Desk:

Grant is back on deck this week as we discuss the release of the new Qantas uniforms, revealed this week to much fanfare. Eight former Royal Australian Navy Kaman SH-2G Super Sea Sprite helicopters, which never saw service after the programme was scrapped two years ago, have been purchased by the New Zealand Government for their Navy at a cost of $A200million ($NZ244million – $US210million). And keeping in the recent theme of aviation lobby groups wading into the upcoming federal election early, the Australian Airports Association is asking the government to consider backing a fund to assist struggling remote area airstrips to the tune of $20million.

Links:

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124. Australia Desk archives can be found at www.australiadesk.net.

In this week’s Across the Pond segment:

This week we look at what’s been happening in the Benelux countries and France with Frenchez Pietersz from Aviation Platform. New low cost carriers, KLM baggage fees and the threat of european hub domination from Schipol all get discussed.

Follow Aviation Platform on Twitter as @AviPlatform on Facebook and LinkedIn.

Find Pieter on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on Facebook at XTPMedia, and at the Aviation Xtended podcast.

Mentioned:

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.