Tag Archives: NASM

AirplaneGeeks 355 Innovations in Flight Family Day 2015

NASM Innovations in Flight Family Day and Outdoor Aviation Display

Interviews from the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum’s Innovations in Flight Family Day and Outdoor Aviation Display.

Micah, Brian, Max, and David

Airplane Geeks Micah, Brian, Max, and David set up recording gear in front of the Junkers Ju-52 3M trimotor, and spent the day interviewing interesting Avgeeks.

Interviews

Elizabeth Borja

Elizabeth Borja

Elizabeth is Reference Coordinator for the National Air & Space Museum Archives. She tells us about the huge quantity of historic data is available in the Archives, and how it is used.

Hungarian baseball team

Hungarian baseball team

Peter Duro

A baseball team from Hungary attended the Innovations in Flight event, and stopped by to visit the Airplane Geeks.

Roger Connor

Roger Connor is Curator for Vertical Flight at the National Air & Space Museum and he tells us about some of the exciting new exhibits that are coming. August 1, 2015, a CH56 in Viet Nam configuration will fly in to join the displays. This public event will include an Osprey and both will be available for walkthrough.

In the Fall, the Sikorsky X-2 prototype will arrive, and an HH-52 joins the Museum next April.

Hillel Glazer

Aerospace engineer and faithful listener Hillel Glazer stopped by with some of his children. Hillel attended the recent AOPA homecoming fly-in and tells us about that, as well as a recent flight in instrument conditions that was a “learning experience.” Son Jacob takes the mic as well.

Dave Klain Mitsubishi MU-2B-60

Dave Klain

Dave Klain and daughter Lauren flew his Mitsubishi MU-2B-60 twin turboprop in for the event. Dave listens to Airplane Geeks and also flies wounded warriors for Veteran’s Airlift Command.

Gen. J.R. “Jack” Dailey, USMC (Ret.)

Jack Dailey is the John and Adrienne Mars Director of the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum. He oversees the operation of both National Air and Space Museum locations — the Museum in Washington, DC and the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia.

Others

Additional interviews with Roger Connor on unmanned aircraft, and Princess Aliyah Pandolfi on the Kashmir World Foundation will appear in future episodes of The UAV Digest.

Dinner

Thanks to all our friends who joined us for dinner after the Innovations in Flight event: John Leech, Rick Engber, Hillel Glazer (and Jacob, Alexander, and Sarah), Stephanie Plummer, Miami Rick, Capt. Jeff, Fred Samson, Ken Coburn and Greg Garretson from GoEngineer, Peter and Mai, as well as our “roadies” Lisa Leard and Michelle Vanderhoof.

Fun for kids

 

Columbia at NASM

 

United 767 at NASM

Credits

Post photos by @DroneMama and @MaxFlight.
Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.

AirplaneGeeks 303 – Become a Pilot Day 2014

David, Rob, Max, and Benet

Recorded at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum during the 10th annual Become a Pilot Family Day and Aviation Display.

This annual event at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, located in Chantilly, Virginia offers not only the Museum’s amazing exhibits, but also about 50 vintage, recreational, and home-built aircraft flown in for one day only. This year, United brought in a Boeing 777 that was open for a tour.

Our visit this year was sponsored by Iridium Communications Inc.

National Transportation Safety Board training center tour

TWA 800

The day before the event at the NASM, the NTSB was kind enough to provide us special access to their training center in Ashburn, Virginia. This marvelous facility is used to train NTSB accident investigators, as well as investigators from other agencies and organizations.

We were given a briefing on the TWA Flight 800 accident investigation, and then toured the aircraft reconstruction, which is used for training with permission of the victim’s families. The depth of the investigation (which took over four years) is amazing and the examining the physical evidence first hand is an experience we will not forget.

None of us came away with any faith in the conspiracy theories that continue to swirl around the accident. All the analysis points to an internal explosion of the fuel vapor in the center tank.

General (ret) John R. “Jack” Dailey

A retired U.S. Marine Corps four-star general and pilot, he’s been the director of the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum since 2000. We talk with the General about his expectations for the event and stimulating STEM. Also, about the future of the Museum with more people visiting online. The NASM is digitizing their database and is planning for free online accessibility. The Museum also plans to bring in more of the aircraft they have.

Capt. Robert Randazzo

1941 ex-Pan American World Airways DC-3 (NC33611)

Robert Randazzo flew-in the 1945 ex-Pan American World Airways DC-3 (NC33611) he has restored in full Pan Am livery and named the “Tabatha May.” We also talk a bit about Randazzio’s past experience racing a T-6 at Reno.

Matt Desch

Iridium Go!

Matt Desch is the CEO of Iridium Communications, the world’s largest satellite system. Their new Iridium Go! product is the first satellite WiFi voice and data hotspot that works anywhere on the planet at any altitude. Interestingly, Iridium offers an API so developers can create apps for the device.

Matt is also on the Board of AOPA, and we talk about the organization’s mission, the value of being a member, current aviation issues, and the Rusty Pilots program. New AOPA President Mark Baker has initiated a series of regional fly-ins across the U.S., with very good results. On the topic of the cost to be a private pilot, we chat about renovating older airplanes as an affordable option.

Iridium was kind enough to sponsor the Airplane Geeks at the event.

Bill Barry

Bill Barry is Chief Historian with the NASA History Program Office, and we talk about what interests an historian at the NASM and the relationship between NASA and the NASM. The predecessor organization of NASA, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), will have been founded 100 ago next year, and we talk about the many significant contributions they made.

Follow the History Program Office on Twitter at @NASAHistory and visit them on Facebook.

Edgar “E.T.” Tello

Seabee

A current B757/767 Captain with United, Tello flew in the B777 on display. But he also owns a Republic Seabee and Rob talks with him about that aircraft. The Seabee was envisioned as a sport plane for pilots returning after the Second World War.

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

Become a Pilot Day 2014, NASM

We’d like to thank the staff and crew at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center for their hard work to make this event a success, and for facilitating the content we bring to you. We’d also like to thank the NTSB for giving us access to their training center, and for their strong dedication to making aviation safer for all of us.

Episode 253 – Become a Pilot Day 2013

Become a Pilot Day

Recorded at the Smithsonian’s National Air & Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center during the 9th annual Become a Pilot Family Day and Aviation Display.

Rob and BenetRob and Benet

Interviews:

Adam Smith, Senior Vice President, Center to Advance the Pilot Community, AOPA.

Joel Westbrook, Executive Producer, Air Fare America. This TV series being developed about GA is based on interesting places you can go, what you can do there, and the restuarants to visit. A hangar rat looks at the hangars behind the hangars, and what you can find there. It’s food, adventure, and pickers. @AirFareAmerica.
Colin an 11 year old airplane geek from Alexandria, Virginia.

David on the new F100 Super Sabre exhibit and some of the aircraft being restored at the Udvay-Hazy Restoration Center: SB-2C Helldiver, Sikorsky JRS-1 Flying Boat, a flying wing.

Bill Knight, Smithsonian Docent and avgeek since he was four years old.

Dave “Bio” Baranek, author of Top Gun Days. Available online, in bookstores, and as an eBook. See topgunbio.com. Bio flew the F-14A Tomcat with several fighter squadrons and was a Tomcat Instructor.

Ryan Ewing from Airlinegeeks.com.

Benet and Rob chat about their interest in aviation, flight attendants, bad mannered passengers, and the Enolla Gay.

John R. “Jack” Dailey, a retired U.S. Marine Corps four-star general and pilot. He’s Director of the National Air & Space Museum.

Marcy Heacker, Program Specialist, Smithsonian Natural History Museum, Feather Identification Lab. See wildlife.faa.gov.

William Edwards, University of Maryland Project Manager of the Gamera human powered helicopter project.

Ryan EwingRyan Ewing

Dave "Bio" BaranekDavid talks with Dave “Bio” Baranek

Smithsonian docent Bill KnightSmithsonian docent Bill Knight

Sikorsky Flying BoatSikorsky Flying Boat

Solar Impulse

The day after the event, the Solar Impulse arrived on it’s flight across the U.S.

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

Episode 245 – Time and Navigation at the Smithsonian

Time and Navigation

David Vanderhoof was invited to be a social media participant for the opening of the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum’s new exhibit, Time and Navigation: The untold story of getting from here to there. He brings us recordings and interviews from the event.

The full selection of audio recordings, (with play times):

How did the aviators "shoot" the sun and stars?

The Winnie Mae, the airplane Wiley Post flew in his record-breaking flights around the world in 1931 and 1933

Time and Navigation: The Untold Story of Getting from Here to There, Fact Sheet:

Opening April 12, 2013, National Mall building, Gallery 213

Presented in collaboration with the National Museum of American History

Sections: Navigating at Sea; Navigating in the Air; Navigating in Space; Inventing Satellite Navigation; and Navigation for Everyone.

Sponsored by: Northrop Grumman Corporation, Exelis Inc., Honeywell, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, U.S. Department of Transportation, Magellan, National Coordination Office for Space-Based Positioning, Navigation & Timing, Rockwell Collins and the Institute of Navigation.

“Time and Navigation” explores how revolutions in timekeeping over three centuries have influenced how people find their way. Through artifacts dating from centuries ago to today, the exhibition traces how timekeeping and navigational technologies evolved to help navigators find their way in different modes of travel, in different eras and different environments. Methods are traced through the decades to show that of all the issues facing navigation, one challenge stands out: The need to determine accurate time.

Twelve Things People Might Not Know about Time and Navigation

1. Although it was possible to navigate at sea before 1700, very precise positions could not be determined without accurate time and reliable clocks.

2. The earliest sea-going marine chronometer made in the United States was produced by Bostonian William Cranch Bond during the War of 1812.

3. Calculating position only by monitoring time, speed and direction is called Dead Reckoning. Measuring movement using only internal sensors is known as Inertial Navigation. Observing the sun, moon, or stars at precise times to determine position is known as Celestial Navigation. Radio Navigation systems use radio signals to maintain a course or fix a position.

4. The first several Soviet and American spacecraft sent to the moon missed it completely and crashed on the moon or were lost in space. Subsequent missions achieved their objectives as better techniques for guidance and navigation were developed.

5. When the first men went to the moon (Apollo 8), they used a sextant to help them navigate.

6. A spacecraft travelling across the solar system navigates by means of precisely timed radio signals sent back and forth to Earth. Navigators on Earth track its location and speed and transmit course adjustments. These techniques allow navigators to guide a probe to a planetary rendezvous or a pinpoint landing.

7. Space shuttles used onboard star trackers to locate their position in space with high accuracy. Once the shuttle reached orbit, the tracker automatically locked onto a star to orient the spacecraft.

8. The fundamental unit of time, the second, was defined in the past by the rotation of the Earth. Since 1967, the second has been defined by the signature frequency of a form of the element cesium.

9. A navigator on a ship at sea 100 years ago needed to know the time to the second. GPS satellite navigation works by measuring time to billionths of a second.

10. Albert Einstein’s understanding of space and time and relativity contributed to global navigation. Because GPS satellites experience lower gravity and move at high speeds, their clocks operate at a different rate than clocks on Earth. Since all the clocks in the system must be synchronized, a net correction of 38 millionths of a second per day must be added to the satellite clock’s time.

11. Increasingly reliable clocks and improved navigation methods have allowed navigators to calculate spacecraft positions with greater accuracy. By 2012 missions could be tracked with 100,000 times the accuracy possible in the early 1960s.

12. Atomic clocks in GPS satellites keep time to within three nanoseconds—three-billionths of a second.

The week’s aviation news:

In this week’s Australia Desk:

Grant is back on deck this week as we discuss the release of the new Qantas uniforms, revealed this week to much fanfare. Eight former Royal Australian Navy Kaman SH-2G Super Sea Sprite helicopters, which never saw service after the programme was scrapped two years ago, have been purchased by the New Zealand Government for their Navy at a cost of $A200million ($NZ244million – $US210million). And keeping in the recent theme of aviation lobby groups wading into the upcoming federal election early, the Australian Airports Association is asking the government to consider backing a fund to assist struggling remote area airstrips to the tune of $20million.

Links:

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124. Australia Desk archives can be found at www.australiadesk.net.

In this week’s Across the Pond segment:

This week we look at what’s been happening in the Benelux countries and France with Frenchez Pietersz from Aviation Platform. New low cost carriers, KLM baggage fees and the threat of european hub domination from Schipol all get discussed.

Follow Aviation Platform on Twitter as @AviPlatform on Facebook and LinkedIn.

Find Pieter on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on Facebook at XTPMedia, and at the Aviation Xtended podcast.

Mentioned:

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

Episode 194 – The Aeroscholar

Guest Steve Harris is currently a senior at the University of Michigan in Aerospace Engineering and writes the Aeroscholar blog. He’s also the president of the UofM Student Chapter of The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), and is a member of the Jet Engine Team of Michigan. Steve is starting to pursue a private pilot’s license, he has taken students on a tour of the top aerospace companies in southern California, he attends the Aerospace Sciences Meeting every year, and through the AIAA he lobbies for the aerospace industry in Washington D.C. Steve Tweets as @Aeroscholar.

The week’s aviation news:

David’s aircraft of the Week: the Aérospatiale SA 315B Lama.

No Australia Desk news report this week, but you can still find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124.

This week on Across the Pond, Pieter talks again to Rohit Rao from AeroBlogger about developments in India with the focus on airlines. There’s more news from Kingfisher and the guys look at some of the new airlines starting up in the region. Find Rohit on Twitter as @TheAeroBlogger.

Find Pieter Johnson on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on his blog Alpha Tango Papa, and also on Facebook at XTPMedia.

Links from Listener Email:

Opening and closing music is provided by Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at http://www.brotherloverocks.com/.

Post photo by David Vanderhoof