Tag Archives: security

418 Airline Security and Safety

 

Aviation security since 9/11, smartphones on airplanes and more lithium-ion battery woes, the Boeing middle of the market airplane, another idea on how to find MH370, flying commercially to Cuba, and a review of the movie Sully.

Guest

Cynthia Drescher

Cynthia Drescher

Cynthia Drescher is a professional travel journalist, a contributing digital editor at Condé Nast Traveler, and a contributing editor at the Runwaygirl Network.

We discuss how airline and airport security have changed in the fifteen years since the 9/11 attacks. Also, the current issue with smartphone battery fires and how the airlines are responding. Cynthia recently examined safety problems when passenger smartphones fall into airplane seats, and we talk about what the airlines might do in response.

Cynthia visited Cuba, having flown there on the first JetBlue flight. She tells us about the travel experience and her impressions of the country and its people. We also learn which airplanes Cynthia enjoys, and the one that is not her favorite.

Follow Cynthia on Twitter at @JetSetCD, and on Instagram.

News

How Airport Security Has Changed Since 9/11

It is estimated that the U.S. has spent almost $100 billion on security since the September 11 attack. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was created by Congress, we have hardened and bulletproof cockpit doors, no-fly lists, detection machines of various sorts, shoe removal, limits on liquids, profiling, checkpoints, and much more. Are we more secure? And what’s next?

Air Force, Running Low on Drone Pilots, Turns to Contractors in Terror Fight

Drones play a large role in the military response to terrorism. A drone requires a pilot, and with lots of drones, the U.S. Air Force needs lots of drone pilots. Private contractors are being used for reconnaissance missions, but are prohibited from being “trigger pullers” and firing weapons.

Samsung’s exploding Galaxy Note faces airline bans

Some Galaxy Note7 smartphones have experienced lithium-ion battery fires. While Samsung has stopped sales of the phone and has initiated an Exchange Program for U.S. consumers, airlines and the FAA are taking action.

The necessity of smart stowage for smartphones on aircraft

Guest Cynthia Drescher describes the safety implications of smartphones that slip inside airline seats, and what might be done about it.

Can Boeing compete with the Airbus A321neo? And does it want to?

In the mid-size aircraft arena, the Boeing 737 MAX 9 is losing to the Airbus A321neo, which is larger and has a longer range. This size-class has been called MOM, or Middle Of the Market, while Boeing is calling it the New Mid-range Airplane or NMA. Such a plane could be a 737 stretch, while others are saying a new twin-aisle is possible.

Drifting Flaperon Decoys Next MH370 Gambit

There’s a new idea in the search for MH370: Drop Boeing 777 flaperon replicas into the sea at suspected crash sites, and see if any end up at the beach on Reunion Island. That’s where a flaperon from the 777 drifted. If one of the replicas does as well, the drop point gives you a targeted area to search.

Lawsuit seeks to block Alaska Airlines’ $4 billion acquisition of Virgin

The plaintiffs argue the deal would weaken competition in the industry, causing job loss and higher fare prices.

The Aircraft of the Week

af-2w_af-2s_vs-25

David continues through this collection of listener-requested aircraft of the week. This week’s aircraft was requested by Mike Stuemer. The Grumman AF Guardian was the bridge between two Classic aircraft: the Grumman TBF Avenger and the S-2 Tracker. It was too big, too slow, and flown in pairs, but it wrote the book on how to track subs.

In the next few weeks, David will take on the challenge brought forth by Chris Ruark: the F-105 Thunderchief, or THUD!

Movie Review

Rob Mark reviews the film “Sully.”

Mentioned

Airventure 2016 in my Sonex – from Mike Smith

How to Eat an Airplane

Tesla hires top designer Randy Rodriguez, man behind: Nissan 370Z, Titan and ICON A5 aircraft

Airbus Loses 2 Orders, Boeing May Gain $7 Billion Fighter Sale

Aeroshell Aerobatic Team 360VR Experience Launched at Oshkosh 2016

AeroShell 2016 VR Experience 360

Yankee Air Museum Destroyed In Fire (OV-10 Bronco Association)

Yankee Air Museum (Wikipedia)

Yankee Air Museum (official site)

The F-35 Stealth Fighter May Never Be Ready for Combat

Credit

Intro music courtesy Brother Love from his Album Of The Year CD. Outtro by Bruno Misonne from The Sound of Flaps.

 

 

AirplaneGeeks 375 Sled Driver Brian Shul

SR-71 Courtesy Lockheed Martin

SR-71 Courtesy Lockheed Martin

Conversation with an SR-71 spy plane pilot, Northrop Grumman wins Long Range Strike Bomber contract, an aerostat breaks loose, Quebec steps in to shore up Bombardier, team forms to produce a “declaration on cyber security” for aviation, and China shows the first COMAC C919 airliner.

Guest

Brian Shul

Brian Shul

Brian Shul served as an Air Force fighter pilot from 1970-1990. Flying close air support during the Viet Nam Conflict, he was shot down near the Cambodian border. Unable to eject, he rode the plane into the jungle and was seriously burned during the ensuing fireball. Lucky to be alive, he spent a year in the hospital and was told his flying days were over.

Miraculously, after many surgeries and months of physical therapy, Brian returned to active flying duty.  He went on to fly the A-7D, he was in the first A-10 squadron, he taught at the Air Force’s TopGun school in the F-5B, and his flying career culminated by flying the SR-71 spy plane.  

Retiring from the Air Force in 1990, Brian SR-71 enginespursued his writing and photography by starting his own business with Gallery One. He was the first man to write a book about flying the SR-71, all illustrated with his own photography.  He did a second book, both of which are now the most popular SR-71 books worldwide.   Additionally, Brian is the only man in America to fly extensively with both the Air Force Thunderbirds and the Navy Blue Angels writing books about both of those teams.

Learn more about Brian and his books at SledDriver.com. Find his impressive photography at Gallery One Images.

News

Northrop Grumman wins Long Range Strike Bomber contract

The Pentagon awarded Northrop Grumman the contract to build the Long Range Strike Bomber  (LRS-B), over the proposals from Boeing and Lockheed Martin. The 80-100 plane fleet is scheduled to enter service in the 2020’s after more than $20 billion in development expenditures. According to Defense News, the component manufacturers have been competitively selected but not announced.

Northrop Grumman launched the Americas New Bomber website and is asking American citizens to sign a letter partitioning elected officials to support the new bomber.

How the Army’s $3 billion spy blimp went from boondoggle to laughingstock

The Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System, (JLENS) is a pair of tethered balloons meant to detect threats to the U.S. such as missiles and manned or unmanned aircraft. According to Raytheon, JLENS “is a system of two aerostats, or tethered airships, that float 10,000 feet in the air. The helium filled aerostats, each nearly as long as a football field, carry powerful radars that can protect a territory roughly the size of Texas from airborne threats.”

Each of the airships is called an “orbit” and the one at Aberdeen Proving Ground north of Baltimore, Maryland broke loose. It was escorted by F-16’s until it came down in Pennsylvania. The 6,700 foot tether was reported to take out power lines causing outages for more than a few people.

Canadian Government Throws Bombardier a Lifeline

After CSeries and Learjet 85 program writedowns, Bombardier posted a $4.9 billion loss in the third quarter. The Learjet 85 program was canceled and the Quebec government will take a 49 percent stake in the CSeries program. Bombardier is a  major Quebec employer.

Airlines step up efforts to tackle cyber security risks

IATA’s 24th AVSEC World Conference was held October 26 – 28, 2015 in Dublin and addressed many cyber security risks. A team has been formed to produce a “declaration on cyber security” that would go to the United Nations’ International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in September, 2016. ICAO member states could sign the declaration if they wish, but this doesn’t create mandatory standards.

Countries warned of dangers flying over Sinai

The United States, Germany and Britain all had overflight warnings in place for Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula,  where a Russian passenger plane went down killing all 224 people on board.

China Unveils First Major Homegrown Passenger Jet, Seen As Potential Competitor For Boeing And Airbus

COMAC (the Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China) rolled out the first C919 airliner which will now undergo ground tests before making its maiden flight in 2016. It is expected to enter service in 2018 or 2019. COMAC said it has orders for 517 of the aircraft.

The Australia News Desk

OzRunways fundraiser

OzRunways fundraiser

Steve’s had a good time at the OzRunways fundraiser for Angel Flight with Matt Hall but now it’s back to work and producing the OzDesk.

CASA says it’ll listen to industry:

KC30A refuels E7A over the Middle East:

Tracey Curtis-Taylor is on her way to Sydney, Australia in a Boeing Stearman:

Across the Pond

Harrier Boys coverPieter reflects back on the iconic Harrier by reviewing the latest book on the subject. Published a few months ago by Grub Street Books, it is a collection of personal stories from RAF and Royal Navy pilots and crewmen. Robert Marston, a Harrier pilot himself, draws together accounts from those who worked with this aircraft. The excitement, camaraderie, and pride shine through in the personal stories of those whose lives were changed by their experience of this iconic aircraft.

Mentioned

Live from the Reno Air Races with SkyChick and Team DarkstarWith Vicky Benzing and L139 owner Dianna Stanger.

Quirky car designer converts light plane into a road-legal vehicle – which he drives his son to school inYou’ve got to love this fun, street-legal, vehicle built using the fuselage of a Cirrus SR22.

Favorite Airplane Paint Jobs

Listeners answered the call to suggest their favorite airline liveries…

From A.V., the Nokair 737’s:

Nokair

From Jeffrey, the Short SC.7 Skyvan:

Peter De Jong

Peter De Jong

Alan Lebeda

Alan Lebeda

From Ian:

Westjet Mickey by Ian

Westjet Mickey by Ian

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.

 

AirplaneGeeks 350 Burt Rutan Is At It Again

Filming Burt Rutan

Antenna Films documents Burt Rutan as he builds the SkiGull, FBI investigates alleged IFE hacker, United Airlines offers bug bounty program, autistic child removed from flight, passenger prevented from making emergency call, and crowdfunding a startup airline.

Guests

Scott B and Sandy Guthrie are the Executive Producers and Co-Creative Directors of Antenna Films, which is producing the documentary film Looking Up, Way Up! The Burt Rutan Story. They are following Burt as he designs and builds the SkiGull plane which he intends to fly around the world in a “Walter Mitty flight” that avoids airports. Scott and Sandy tell us about the SkiGull and the film, but also give us some insights into Burt Rutan, the man.

The team used Kickstarter to jumpstart the documentary since Burt is moving ahead quickly, but they intend to build a sustainable community around this project. Visit the documentary website at LookingUpWayUp.com and the project Facebook page.

Scott and Sandy have been making films for more than 20 years and formed Antenna Films in 2000 to tell compelling stories. Their work has appeared on National Geographic, Discovery, A&E, Lifetime and Sundance TV. Antenna produced the award winning Virgin Galactic series following the development of the world’s first spaceline. Other credits include the first one-hour episode of Virgin Galactic: Will it Fly for National Geographic, and the Peabody Award and Cine Golden Eagle Award-winning specials Black Sky: The Race for Space and  Winning the X-Prize on Discovery.

News

FBI Investigating Claim Computer Expert Hacked Plane In-Flight

Computer security expert Chris Roberts has told investigators that he hacked into the IFE system through boxes under the seats 15 to 20 times. He says he even “caused one of the airplane engines to climb resulting in a lateral or sideways movement of the plane.”

Law enforcement is investigating and says the electronics box under the seat shows signs of tampering. But they also say “there is no credible information to suggest an airplane’s flight control system can be accessed or manipulated from its in-flight entertainment system.”

United Airlines bug bounty program

White hat hackers are invited to probe for bugs that affect United “websites, apps and/or online portals” in exchange for up to one million award miles.

An autistic girl’s entire family was kicked off a plane because she wanted a First Class meal

Woman Claims She and Daughter With Autism Were Kicked Off United Airlines Flight

A Range of Reactions to Airline’s Removal of Autistic Child

A United Airlines pilot diverted a Portland flight to Salt Lake City to remove a family with an autistic 15 year old daughter. The situation developed after the girl required a hot meal. Was she disruptive? Some say no.

Woman told she couldn’t call suicidal husband during flight

A woman on a Southwest Airlines flight received a text from her husband that read, “Karen, please forgive me for what I am about to do, I am going to kill myself.” The cabin crew would not allow the call. Upon arrival at the gate, the woman called the police, but it was too late.

Struggling start-up airline turns to crowdfunding for cash

Avatar Airlines claims it’s “poised to revolutionize the airline industry as ‘the ultra-low fare’ leader with no baggage fees (up to two) and fares as low as $19” on 581-seat Boeing 747-400 aircraft. Avatar has started a crowdfunding campaign.

The Australia News Desk

The boys are back with the sad news that the “Wings Over Illawarra” show had to be cancelled due to terrible weather.

Deciding to go with military stories, the Desk opens with the news that two RAAF KC30As made multiple boom contacts off the coast of Brisbane recently. Although no gas was passed (that’s going to happen soon) it verifies that the boom is finally all but working!

Next they report that SQNLDR Andrew “Jacko” Jackson has flown the first RAAF F35. He became the first Australian to fly an F35 last month but now he’s at Luke AFB and flying A35-001 (our first RAAF F35). Apparently the kangaroo painted on the side makes all the difference!

Matt Hall took 2nd place at the Chiba (Japan) leg of the Red Bull Air Race. He’s also looking for a major “name the team” sponsor.

Mentioned

Flaris

Credit

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at brotherloverocks.com.

 

Episode 251 – John Zimmerman from Sporty’s

Jesus Calderon Office at Night

Our guest this episode is John Zimmerman, a pilot and a Vice President at Sporty’s, the world’s largest pilot shop.

John talks to us about ADS-B, what it is, what you can do with it, options for implementing it, and how much it costs. We touch on the FAA strategy for getting aircraft operating in the U.S. airspace to ADS-B by 2020 – offering free weather as the carrot.

Also, ADS-B in-only portable receivers, like the Stratus for the iPad, which gives you “portable avionics” – something useful for club airplanes, for example. John offers an explanation for why the iPad, and especially the Mini, is so dominant among tablets for aviators.

We talk about Sporty’s Easy Approval solution for FAA approval to use your iPad with Foreflight Mobile as your Electronic Flight Bag. Also the factory assembled Vans RV-12 and the 2014 Sporty’s sweepstakes and Sporty’s Academy for flight training.

Find Sporty’s on Twitter as @Sportys.

The week’s aviation news:

A Royal New Zealand Air Force C-130H at Auckland in 2012 by John ThomsonRoyal New Zealand Air Force C-130H at Auckland in 2012 by John Thomson

In this week’s Australia Desk:

We’ve often talked about the high cost of using airports in Australia, particularly the major hubs, and it seems the high cost of operating out of Melbourne’s Essendon Airport have forced a major user, business jet operator MyJet, to look for better options. Their solution comes in the form of relocating, thanks in part to some financial support from the Victorian government, to the regional city of Bendigo, 200km north west of Melbourne. During the week, they announced the opening of their new $A1.5million facility at the city’s airport, the largest such investment there in 40 years. They will now operate their small fleet of executive charter aircraft from this new base, using Essendon only as a pickup/drop off point.

MyJet soars with $1.5 million Bendigo development

On the subject of investment, Qantas announced this week that they’ll be putting millions of extra dollars into their facilities in Perth, Western Australia, as part of their drive to remain competitive with Virgin Australia. The plans call for upgrades to terminals & lounges, news and improved catering options, additional flights each day and increasing the number of A330s operating on routes to and from Perth. The city is a major hub for people working in the mining & resources sector, and CEO Allan Joyce said this week that he sees no end in sight to the boom conditions that are creating the resulting demands on his airline.

Qantas invests more in WA as competition mounts

Qantas to build new Club at Perth Airport as Joyce sees no end to boom

Airbus has also been in the news this week with a push to get the New Zealand government to consider the A400M & the C295 as possible replacement for their C130H fleet. The RNZAF currently operates five C130H airframes, all of which have undergone life extension programmes in recent years, but Airbus executives are keen to see their military airlifters play a role in this region of the world. We wonder if they’ll try to convince the RAAF to consider the “Grizzly” as well.

A400M and C295W to be pitched to NZ

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu. Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124. Australia Desk archives can be found at www.australiadesk.net.

In this week’s Across the Pond segment:

This week on Across The Pond we talk to Airplane Geeks fan and voice over artist Jesús Calderón. Jesús is an Air Traffic Controller in the Barcelona Tower and explains his passion about flying and also gives the team some feedback about the programme.

Follow Jesús as @Hardenaw on Twitter and find him on Facebook. Lead post photo is Jesús Calderón’s office at night.

Find Pieter on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on Facebook at XTPMedia, and at the Aviation Xtended podcast.

Mentioned:

Opening and closing music courtesy Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

Episode 198 – Kip Hawley on the TSA

Kip Hawley

Guest Kip Hawley was Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) from July 2005 to January 2009. He’s also just written the book, “Permanent Emergency: Inside the TSA and the Fight for the Future of American Security” available through his website (KipHawley.com), Amazon.com, and many bookstores.

We talk with Kip about how he came to be the TSA Administrator, the risk that business aviation presents, and the Large Aircraft Security Program. Kip explains why the full TSA “body search” shouldn’t be necessary and he gives us some interesting details about the plot that led to the ban on liquids over 3 ounces. We consider calls to privatize the TSA, and discuss managing security and managing risk, the public perception of “the threat” and just how large it really is, security theater, the cost of technology, behavioral profiling, the effects of TSA security on the travelling public and thus on the commercial aviation industry, the history of Blogger Bob from The TSA Blog, and even a little peek inside the Bush oval office.

Kip observes that the risk in counter-terrorism is nonlinear, whereas in aviation safety it is linear. We have to be looking for nonlinear risk but a lot of the risk models used came out of the FAA safety regime and don’t apply well to security.

The week’s aviation news:

In this week’s Australia Desk report:

Alligator Airways loses court bid to overturn CASA grounding, Army temporarily grounds Tiger Armed Recon Helicopters, Lockheed Martin ready to begin training RAAF pilots, Sydney Airport CEO claims the airport has plenty of spare space for expansion, Airservices Australia CEO steps down unexpectedly, China Southern to establish the “Canton Route” from Australia to the UK, Air Pacific announces a re-branding to Fiji Airways.

Find more from Grant and Steve at the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and follow the show on Twitter at @pcdu Steve’s at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124.

In this week’s Across the Pond segment:

Pieter Johnson asks our adopted Spanish correspondent Diego Lopez-Salazar from Aeropodcast.com to give us some feedback on his recent trip to Mexico. He gives us a summary of the airline structure there and the key carrifull service, low cost models.

Find Pieter Johnson on Twitter as @Nascothornet, on his blog Alpha Tango Papa, and also on Facebook at XTPMedia.

Opening and closing music is provided by Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at www.brotherloverocks.com.

Episode 147 – Todd McClamroch’s Flight Blog

QF-4E phantom of 82d Aerial Target Sqd Part of USAF Heritage Flight

Todd McClamroch from My Flight Blog.com is our guest this episode. Todd’s site is one of the longest running General Aviation blogs around, and has been featured in the press including Wall Street Journal, AOPA Pilot and AOPA Flight Training Magazine. We talk about reasons for the high dropout rate among student pilots, including the lack of inclusion in pilot communities, the role of the CFI and mentors in helping students complete their flight training, and the the value of events for students. You can follow Todd on Twitter at @MyFlightBlog.

Be sure to see Max, Rob, Dan, and David at the Become a Pilot Family Day and Fly-In June 18, 2011, 10 a.m. – 3p.m., at the National Air and Space Museum’s Udvar-Hazy Center next to Dulles International Airport. The Geeks will be joining Milford and Charlie from FlightTime Radio, along with some other aviation podcasters as they broadcast their show live.

Normally, FlightTime Radio runs for an hour, but we’re going to buy a second hour of air time for this event. You can help by making a small donation to buy another hour of time for aviation greatness on the radio station. See http://www.airplanegeeks.com/send-the-airplane-geeks-to-washington/ for more information.

The week’s aviation news:

Steve Visscher and Grant McHerron from the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast provide an interesting Australia Desk Report with Stephen Force from the Airspeed podcast. Be sure to check out the Acrocamp site to follow the progress of that documentary film. The Plane Crazy Down Under podcast is on Twitter at @pcdu, Steve at @stevevisscher and Grant at @falcon124.

In this week’s Across the Pond segment, Pieter Johnson talks with Diego López-Salazar from the Spanish aviation podcast AeroPodcast about the strength of Spanish airlines and if the threat of striking airport workers has finally subisided in Spain. Find Pieter on Twitter at @Nascothornet and Diego at
@dlopezsalazar.

Mentions:

Follow the @AirplaneGeeks on Twitter and on Facebook, send us email at thegeeks@airplanegeeks.com, or leave a message on our listener line: (361) GEEKS01.

Opening and closing music is provided by Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at http://www.brotherloverocks.com/.

Episode 123 – Listener Mailbag

QANTAS 90th Birthday Celebrations 13th Nov 2010

This week we forgo the usual aviation news and industry guest to instead focus on listener mail. We received a lot of email, Facebook posts, and vmail on our listener line with questions and suggestions so that’s what this episode is all about.

Topics:

Ben on The World Airport Data App.

David on the educational path to an airline pilot job.

Micah on free holiday WiFi provided by Google and banning toner cartridges.

Don on the corporate use of social media.

Benet on the business aviation recovery.

David on a future ATC guest.

Richard on having a glider topic.

Allan asking who will be the next CSeries customer.

Anthony on AvWeb’s coverage of AOPA.

Ian his photos, new blog, oil-free turbine technology.

Hoovenson on the BA Flight 38 crash and the freezing point of water.

Stephen asks for the top 5 military Ace’s, top 5 business jets, and top 5 aviation CEO’s.

@flyingwithfish on the “new” CLEAR registered traveler program using “old” CLEAR data.

Tim on aviation enthusiast destinations in Florida.

We also have David’s This Week in Aviation history segment, the Australia Desk report by Steve and Grant from the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast, and Pieter Johnson’s latest Across the Pond segment.

Mentions:

The World Airport Data App

N-Number for US registered aircraft

VH Register for Australian registered aircraftFree Holiday WiFi

Paula Williams has written the book: Flight Plan to Success: New Media Marketing for the Aviation Industry

Ian’s new blog: YYCE3, his photos, and Oil-Free Turbomachinery Technology for Rotorcraft Propulsion and Advanced Aerospace Propulsion and Power, and this NASA article.

The Naked Scientists

Clear: What Gives? from the TSA Blog

TSA asked to ensure safety of customer data after Clear closing

Fantasy of Flight

Aviation Enthusiasts Corner

QANTAS 90th Birthday Celebrations 13th Nov 2010 by Plane Crazy Down Under Podcast.

Follow the @AirplaneGeeks on Twitter and on Facebook, send us email at thegeeks@airplanegeeks.com, or leave a message on our listener line: (361) GEEKS01.

Opening and closing music is provided by Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. You can find his great music at http://www.brotherloverocks.com/.

Photo by Steve Visscher.

Episode 80 – Chris Elliott on Security

Mesa Airlines

Travel writer Christopher Elliott joins the airplane geeks to talk aviation and airline security. Chris is one of the two blogger/journalists served with a subpoena by the Department of Homeland Security after posting the government directive for airline security procedures after the attempted Christmas 2009 terrorist bombing of Northwest Airlines Flight 253. Chris is the reader advocate for National Geographic Traveler magazine, he writes the syndicated Travel Troubleshooter column, produces a weekly commentary and podcast on MSNBC.com, writes the Navigator column in Sunday’s Washington Post, and authors the Elliott.org travel blog.

David Vanderhoof has another This Week in Aviation, Steve Visscher and Grant McHerron from the Plane Crazy Down Under podcast have their Australia Desk report, and Court returns with another Whiskey Tango Foxtrot segment.

Follow the @AirplaneGeeks on Twitter, send us email at thegeeks@airplanegeeks.com, or leave a message on our listener line: (361) GEEKS01.

This episode’s opening and closing music is provided by Brother Love from the Album Of The Year CD. Visit his site at http://www.brotherloverocks.com/.

Episode 57 – Air Racing and TSA Blogging

three plane noses top contenders

Dan, Rob, and Max are joined this episode by two guests:  Chris Webb, who directed and co-produced the documentary film, Air Racer: Chasing the Dream, and Blogger Bob from The TSA Blog, a very active site.

This week’s news:

As always, we have a report from the boys down under at the Airplane Geeks Australia Desk.  Steve and Grant, by the way, now have their own podcast, Plane Crazy Down Under. We also have a This Week in Aviation segment.

Don’t forget to send us your ideas for Airplane Geeks T-Shirts and we’re still collecting good United stories so send them in by email, voice mail, or mp3.

Follow the Airplane Geeks on Twitter as @AirplaneGeeks, send us email at thegeeks@airplanegeeks.com, or leave us voice mail at (812) 757-4252.

This episode’s opening and closing music is provided by Brother Love. You can visit his site at brotherloverocks.com.